POLITICS

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Re: POLITICS

Post by thelivyjr » Thu Apr 08, 2021 1:40 p

REUTERS

"WRAPUP 1-Biden willing to negotiate on corporate taxes, but 'sick and tired' of non-payers"


By Trevor Hunnicutt, Jeff Mason

APRIL 7, 2021

WASHINGTON, April 7 (Reuters) - President Joe Biden on Wednesday made a fiery appeal for U.S companies to foot most of the bill for his $2 trillion-plus infrastructure plan, but signaled an openness to negotiate over exactly how much they would have to pay.

“I’m willing to negotiate that,” he told reporters.

“But we’ve got to pay for this.”

Biden faces stiff opposition from Republicans, major corporations and even some in his own Democratic Party to elements of the proposal he laid out a week ago, which must be approved by Congress to become a reality.

The president argued that the United States’ position as a pre-eminent global power was under threat from China if the investments he outlined were not made, saying it would be unacceptable not to move forward.

“America is no longer the leader in the world because we’re not investing,” Biden said.

“I don’t know why we don’t get this.”


China, he said, is “counting on American democracy to be too slow, too limited and too divided to keep pace” and “we can’t afford to prove them right.”

The president has proposed making investments over eight years in building roads and bridges, retrofitting homes, expanding broadband internet access, caring for the elderly, financing domestic manufacturing and building high-speed rail.

Biden’s plan would not add to the country’s debt in the long run, the White House says.

The largest share of funding would come from an increase in the corporate tax rate to 28% from the 21% levy set by then-President Donald Trump’s 2017 tax cut.


The administration released more details on Wednesday about the tax components of the plan, which also includes higher levies on companies’ overseas earnings, a new minimum tax on the profits companies report to investors and funding for more Internal Revenue Service enforcement officials.

Those efforts, dubbed the “Made in America Tax Plan,” would raise $2.5 trillion over 15 years, the Treasury Department said.

Reuters interviewed more than a dozen corporate and White House officials engaged in the infrastructure push.

Most expect the White House and business groups to compromise on a 25% corporate tax rate.


WITHERING CRITICISM

The business lobby and Republicans have been withering in their criticism of the funding side of the proposal.

Still, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell left open the possibility of compromise.

He told reporters in Kentucky on Wednesday that an infrastructure bill could win Republican support if it targets traditional projects involving roads, bridges and broadband without “completely revisiting” the 2017 tax cut.

One of Biden’s closest allies in the Senate, Democrat Chris Coons of Delaware, issued an ultimatum to Republicans on Wednesday.

He said they would have until the end of May to negotiate a compromise bill before Democrats move sweeping legislation on their own.

A ruling by the U.S. Senate parliamentarian on Monday would allow Democrats to pass the bill even in the face of a Republican filibuster, relying on a tie-breaking vote from Vice President Kamala Harris in the 50-50 chamber.

Sixty votes are usually needed to overcome filibusters.

Coons told Punchbowl News that several senior Senate Republicans have privately signaled they would support a package of up to $1 trillion that targets roads, bridges and other typical infrastructure areas and includes some tax increases to pay for legislation.

‘SICK AND TIRED’

U.S. Chamber of Commerce chief policy officer Neil Bradley said the need for infrastructure was no excuse for passing “tax hikes that will hurt American businesses and cost American jobs.”

Biden countered by taking aim at companies paying little to nothing in federal taxes.

“I’m not trying to punish anybody, but damn it - maybe it’s because I come from a middle-class neighborhood - I’m sick and tired of ordinary people being fleeced,” he said.

Individual taxpayers, whose taxes are deducted from their paychecks, make up a big chunk of U.S. federal government funding.

Amazon.com Inc Chief Executive Jeff Bezos said on Tuesday that he supports hiking the U.S. corporate tax rate as part of an infrastructure overhaul.

But the carefully worded statement stopped short of endorsing any specific tax or spending proposal made by Biden.

Reporting by Trevor Hunnicutt and Jeff Mason; Additional reporting by David Morgan, David Shepardson, David Lawder and Jarrett Renshaw; Editing by Heather Timmons, Peter Cooney and Grant McCool

https://www.reuters.com/article/usa-tax ... SL1N2M0302

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Re: POLITICS

Post by thelivyjr » Thu Apr 08, 2021 1:40 p

REUTERS

"WRAPUP 1-Biden willing to negotiate on corporate taxes, but 'sick and tired' of non-payers"


By Trevor Hunnicutt, Jeff Mason

APRIL 7, 2021

WASHINGTON, April 7 (Reuters) - President Joe Biden on Wednesday made a fiery appeal for U.S companies to foot most of the bill for his $2 trillion-plus infrastructure plan, but signaled an openness to negotiate over exactly how much they would have to pay.

“I’m willing to negotiate that,” he told reporters.

“But we’ve got to pay for this.”

Biden faces stiff opposition from Republicans, major corporations and even some in his own Democratic Party to elements of the proposal he laid out a week ago, which must be approved by Congress to become a reality.

The president argued that the United States’ position as a pre-eminent global power was under threat from China if the investments he outlined were not made, saying it would be unacceptable not to move forward.

“America is no longer the leader in the world because we’re not investing,” Biden said.

“I don’t know why we don’t get this.”


China, he said, is “counting on American democracy to be too slow, too limited and too divided to keep pace” and “we can’t afford to prove them right.”

The president has proposed making investments over eight years in building roads and bridges, retrofitting homes, expanding broadband internet access, caring for the elderly, financing domestic manufacturing and building high-speed rail.

Biden’s plan would not add to the country’s debt in the long run, the White House says.

The largest share of funding would come from an increase in the corporate tax rate to 28% from the 21% levy set by then-President Donald Trump’s 2017 tax cut.


The administration released more details on Wednesday about the tax components of the plan, which also includes higher levies on companies’ overseas earnings, a new minimum tax on the profits companies report to investors and funding for more Internal Revenue Service enforcement officials.

Those efforts, dubbed the “Made in America Tax Plan,” would raise $2.5 trillion over 15 years, the Treasury Department said.

Reuters interviewed more than a dozen corporate and White House officials engaged in the infrastructure push.

Most expect the White House and business groups to compromise on a 25% corporate tax rate.


WITHERING CRITICISM

The business lobby and Republicans have been withering in their criticism of the funding side of the proposal.

Still, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell left open the possibility of compromise.

He told reporters in Kentucky on Wednesday that an infrastructure bill could win Republican support if it targets traditional projects involving roads, bridges and broadband without “completely revisiting” the 2017 tax cut.

One of Biden’s closest allies in the Senate, Democrat Chris Coons of Delaware, issued an ultimatum to Republicans on Wednesday.

He said they would have until the end of May to negotiate a compromise bill before Democrats move sweeping legislation on their own.

A ruling by the U.S. Senate parliamentarian on Monday would allow Democrats to pass the bill even in the face of a Republican filibuster, relying on a tie-breaking vote from Vice President Kamala Harris in the 50-50 chamber.

Sixty votes are usually needed to overcome filibusters.

Coons told Punchbowl News that several senior Senate Republicans have privately signaled they would support a package of up to $1 trillion that targets roads, bridges and other typical infrastructure areas and includes some tax increases to pay for legislation.

‘SICK AND TIRED’

U.S. Chamber of Commerce chief policy officer Neil Bradley said the need for infrastructure was no excuse for passing “tax hikes that will hurt American businesses and cost American jobs.”

Biden countered by taking aim at companies paying little to nothing in federal taxes.

“I’m not trying to punish anybody, but damn it - maybe it’s because I come from a middle-class neighborhood - I’m sick and tired of ordinary people being fleeced,” he said.

Individual taxpayers, whose taxes are deducted from their paychecks, make up a big chunk of U.S. federal government funding.

Amazon.com Inc Chief Executive Jeff Bezos said on Tuesday that he supports hiking the U.S. corporate tax rate as part of an infrastructure overhaul.

But the carefully worded statement stopped short of endorsing any specific tax or spending proposal made by Biden.

Reporting by Trevor Hunnicutt and Jeff Mason; Additional reporting by David Morgan, David Shepardson, David Lawder and Jarrett Renshaw; Editing by Heather Timmons, Peter Cooney and Grant McCool

https://www.reuters.com/article/usa-tax ... SL1N2M0302

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Re: POLITICS

Post by thelivyjr » Thu Apr 08, 2021 1:40 p

REUTERS

"U.S. Treasury deputy chief sees majority of countries joining minimum tax deal"


By Reuters Staff

APRIL 7, 2021

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. Treasury Deputy Secretary Wally Adeyemo said on Wednesday that he believed the United States can secure an agreement with the “vast majority” of the world’s countries to impose minimum corporate taxes.

Adeyemo, in an interview on CNBC television, also said that the Treasury in those negotiations would not support digital services taxes that are discriminatory toward American companies.

“We have supported taxation that makes sure that companies have to pay a level rate throughout the world."

"That’s why we’re in favor of a minimum global tax to make sure that companies are no longer able to skirt taxation in the United States and around the world,” Adeyemo said.

Reporting by David Lawder; Editing by Leslie Adler

https://www.reuters.com/article/usa-tax ... SW1N2HO04K

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Re: POLITICS

Post by thelivyjr » Thu Apr 08, 2021 1:40 p

REUTERS

"Fed expects to keep supporting economy 'for some time,' minutes show"


By Howard Schneider, Ann Saphir

APRIL 7, 2021

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Federal Reserve officials remain wary about the ongoing risks of the coronavirus pandemic and are committed to bolstering the economy until its recovery is more secure, minutes of the U.S. central bank’s latest policy meeting showed on Wednesday.

With their own forecasts projecting the strongest run of U.S. economic growth in nearly 40 years, “participants agreed that the economy remained far from the (Fed’s) longer-run goals and that the path ahead remained highly uncertain,” the minutes from the March 16-17 meeting said.

“Participants noted that it would likely be some time,” before conditions improved enough for the central bank to consider reducing its current level of support.

Though several policymakers at the meeting indicated they thought interest rates might need to increase sooner than anticipated by the bulk of their colleagues, and perhaps as soon as next year, there was little sense of urgency around that issue in the minutes.

Labor markets were improving, but remained gashed by the pandemic.

Inflation would pick up, the minutes noted, but likely subside next year.

A recent jump in U.S. Treasury yields was “generally viewed ... as reflecting the improved economic outlook.”

Only a couple of the officials cited possible financial stability risks flowing from the Fed’s current policy of maintaining its overnight benchmark lending rate near zero and buying $120 billion in bonds every month – a setting the Fed says is locked in until the economy is well on its way to being healed.

That process is underway, with the economy buoyed by the Fed’s support, massive fiscal spending pushed by the White House and passed by Congress, and an accelerating COVID-19 vaccination program.

But even with a “brighter outlook,” Fed Governor Lael Brainard said on CNBC that the wounds to the economy remain deep, and the Fed’s new approach is to not act until its employment and inflation goals are secured.

Policymakers expect “considerably better outcomes on growth, and employment and inflation” in coming months, Brainard said.

“But that is an outlook."

"We are going to have to actually see that in the data,” and with millions of jobs still missing due to the pandemic “we have some distance to go.”

But progress may also come fast as the economy reopens and the impact of the vaccines is felt.

The U.S. economy added nearly a million jobs in March, and that pace may well continue as more activities are considered safe to resume.

Bob Miller, BlackRock’s head of fixed income for the Americas, said he felt the Fed could not for much longer paper over the gap between the economy’s continued progress and its own insistence on maintaining policies designed for a crisis.

“It’s difficult to understand how policy is properly calibrated now."

"The same emergency stance remains despite the absence of emergency conditions,” Miller wrote.

“The unwillingness to acknowledge the degree of improvement looks increasingly challenged,” a stance that may need to change perhaps by the Fed’s June policy meeting.


‘WILLING TO BE BOLDER’

Prices on a variety of securities affected by the Fed’s target interest rate show investors expect the central bank to raise rates sooner than its own projections indicate.

Chicago Fed President Charles Evans, who agrees with the majority of his colleagues that the Fed’s benchmark overnight interest rate will likely need to stay near zero through 2023, said he envisions an uncomfortable period of higher inflation this year.

But he insisted the Fed shouldn’t budge until it’s sure that prices won’t just fall back again below its 2% inflation goal.

“We really have to be patient and be willing to be bolder than most conservative central bankers would choose to be,” he told reporters after an event organized by the University of Nevada, Reno.


Speaking separately at a virtual session organized by UBS, Dallas Fed President Robert Kaplan reiterated his longstanding worries that low interest rates and the Fed’s bond purchases could fuel excesses in markets.

Once the pandemic has receded, Kaplan said, the Fed should pare its bond-buying and move toward raising rates in 2022, and he signaled he may even be open to doing both at once.

Reporting by Howard Schneider, Ann Saphir, Jonnelle Marte; Editing by Dan Burns, Andrea Ricci and Paul Simao

https://www.reuters.com/article/usa-fed ... SL1N2M01WM

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Re: POLITICS

Post by thelivyjr » Thu Apr 08, 2021 1:40 p

REUTERS

"A third of COVID survivors suffer neurological or mental disorders: study"


By Kate Kelland

APRIL 6, 2021

LONDON (Reuters) - One in three COVID-19 survivors in a study of more than 230,000 mostly American patients were diagnosed with a brain or psychiatric disorder within six months, suggesting the pandemic could lead to a wave of mental and neurological problems, scientists said on Tuesday.

Researchers who conducted the analysis said it was not clear how the virus was linked to psychiatric conditions such as anxiety and depression, but that these were the most common diagnoses among the 14 disorders they looked at.

Post-COVID cases of stroke, dementia and other neurological disorders were rarer, the researchers said, but were still significant, especially in those who had severe COVID-19.

“Although the individual risks for most disorders are small, the effect across the whole population may be substantial,” said Paul Harrison, a professor of psychiatry at Oxford University who co-led the work.

Max Taquet, also an Oxford psychiatrist who worked with Harrison, noted that the study was not able to examine the biological or psychological mechanisms involved, but said urgent research is needed to identify these “with a view to preventing or treating them”.

Health experts are increasingly concerned by evidence of higher risks of brain and mental health disorders among COVID-19 survivors.

A previous study by the same researchers found last year that 20% of COVID-19 survivors were diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder within three months.


The new findings, published in the Lancet Psychiatry journal, analysed health records of 236,379 COVID-19 patients, mostly from the United States, and found 34% had been diagnosed with neurological or psychiatric illnesses within six months.

The disorders were significantly more common in COVID-19 patients than in comparison groups of people who recovered from flu or other respiratory infections over the same time period, the scientists said, suggesting COVID-19 had a specific impact.

Anxiety, at 17%, and mood disorders, at 14%, were the most common, and did not appear to be related to how mild or severe the patient’s COVID-19 infection had been.

Among those who had been admitted to intensive care with severe COVID-19 however, 7% had a stroke within six months, and almost 2% were diagnosed with dementia.

Independent experts said the findings were worrying.

“This is a very important paper."

"It confirms beyond any reasonable doubt that COVID-19 affects both brain and mind in equal measure,” said Simon Wessely, chair of psychiatry at King’s College London.

“The impact COVID-19 is having on individuals’ mental health can be severe,” said Lea Milligan, chief executive of the MQ Mental Health research charity.

“This is contributing to the already rising levels of mental illness and requires further, urgent research.”


Reporting by Kate Kelland, editing by Emelia Sithole-Matarise

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-heal ... SKBN2BT2ZI

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Re: POLITICS

Post by thelivyjr » Thu Apr 08, 2021 1:40 p

REUTERS

"Clear link between AstraZeneca vaccine and rare blood clots in brain, EMA official tells paper"


By Reuters Staff

APRIL 6, 2021

ROME (Reuters) - There is a link between AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine and very rare blood clots in the brain but the possible causes are still unknown, a senior official for the European Medicines Agency (EMA) said in an interview published on Tuesday.

However, the EMA later said in a statement that its review of the vaccine was ongoing and it expected to announce its findings on Wednesday or Thursday.

An AstraZeneca spokesman declined to comment on the matter.

“In my opinion, we can now say it, it is clear that there is an association (of the brain blood clots) with the vaccine."

"However, we still do not know what causes this reaction,” Marco Cavaleri, chair of the vaccine evaulation team at the EMA, told Italian daily Il Messagero.

Cavaleri provided no evidence to support his comment.

The EMA has repeatedly said the benefits of the AstraZeneca shot outweigh the risks as it investigates 44 reports of an extremely rare brain clotting ailment known as cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) out of 9.2 million people in the European Economic Area who have received the vaccine.

The World Health Organization has also backed the vaccine.

AstraZeneca has said previously its studies have found no higher risk of clots because of its vaccine.

Cavaleri said the EMA would say in its review that there is a link but was not likely to give an indication this week regarding the age of individuals to whom the AstraZeneca shot should be given.

Some countries, including France, Germany and the Netherlands, have suspending the use of the vaccine in younger people while the investigations continue.

REVIEW ONGOING

In response to Cavaleri’s comments, the Amsterdam-based EMA said in a statement on Tuesday: “EMA’s Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee (PRAC) has not yet reached a conclusion and the review (of any possible link) is currently ongoing.”

The EMA said last week that its review had at present not identified any specific risk factors, such as age, gender or a previous medical history of clotting disorders, for these very rare events.

A causal link with the vaccine is not proven, but is possible and further analysis is continuing, the agency said.

A high proportion among the reported cases affected young and middle-aged women but that did not lead EMA to conclude this cohort was particularly at risk from AstraZeneca’s shot.

Scientists are exploring several possibilities that might explain the extremely rare brain blood clots that occurred in individuals in the days and weeks after receiving the AstraZeneca vaccine.

European investigators have put forward one theory that the vaccine triggers an unusual antibody in some rare cases; others are trying to understand whether the cases are linked with birth control pills.

But many scientists say there is no definitive evidence and it is not clear whether or why AstraZeneca’s vaccine would cause an issue not shared by other vaccines that target a similar part of the coronavirus.

In a separate interview, Armando Genazzani, a member of the EMA’s Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP), told La Stampa daily that it was “plausible” that the blood clots were correlated with the AstraZeneca vaccine.

The AstraZeneca vaccine is based on a modified chimpanzee adenovirus vector, ChAdOx1, developed at Oxford University, and is one of several adenovirus-vector COVID-19 vaccines.

The current vaccine rollout represents the first use of viral vector vaccines on such a global scale.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-heal ... SKBN2BT1ER

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Re: POLITICS

Post by thelivyjr » Thu Apr 08, 2021 1:40 p

REUTERS

"U.S. Senate parliamentarian says Democrats can use reconciliation to pass more bills"


By Reuters Staff

APRIL 5, 2021

WASHINGTON (Reuters) -The U.S. Senate parliamentarian ruled on Monday that Democrats may use a procedural tool known as reconciliation to pass more legislation this year, a spokesman for Democratic leader Chuck Schumer said, which could clear the way for passage of an infrastructure bill without Republican support.

Spokesman Justin Goodman said that Democrats had not decided whether to use reconciliation, which they employed to pass President Joe Biden’s $1.9 trillion COVID relief bill last month without Republican votes.

But Monday’s ruling by Senate parliamentarian Elizabeth MacDonough means they can do so with just a simple majority in the Senate, by treating the measure as a revision of budget legislation.

Doing so would bypass a potential Republican filibuster, in which legislation would need 60 votes to pass.

The Senate is currently divided 50-50 between the Democratic and Republican caucuses, but Democrats have control of the chamber because Vice President Kamala Harris can break a tie.

“The Parliamentarian’s opinion is an important step forward that this key pathway is available to Democrats if needed,” Goodman said.

Biden last week proposed a $2 trillion infrastructure plan, which Republicans have said they would oppose.

Biden has said he wants to negotiate the measure with lawmakers from both parties.

But he would be willing to push through the infrastructure bill without the support of Republican lawmakers in the absence of a bipartisan agreement, Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm said on Sunday.


Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell said last week that Biden’s plan would raise taxes and increase debt, and he vowed to fight it “every step of the way.”

Democratic Senator Ron Wyden, chairman of the chamber’s Finance Committee, said he was pleased by the parliamentarian’s ruling.

“The American people want bold action to address our country’s many challenges, and Democrats now have more options to overcome Republican obstruction and get things done,” he said.

Reporting by Eric Beech; Additional reporting by Patricia Zengerle; Editing by Peter Cooney

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa- ... SKBN2BS23F

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Re: POLITICS

Post by thelivyjr » Thu Apr 08, 2021 1:40 p

REUTERS

"West Virginia's Manchin, flexing political muscle, leaves U.S. Senate Democrats in lurch"


By Reuters Staff

APRIL 8, 2021

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Congressional Democrats trying to advance President Joe Biden’s $2.3 trillion infrastructure plan were left wondering on Thursday whether one of their own, Senator Joe Manchin, might revolt if the party tries to act without Republican buy-in.

The West Virginia senator, in a column published by the Washington Post, said lawmakers should be “alarmed” at the possibility that Senate Democrats could use a maneuver called “reconciliation” to pass the package with only Democratic votes, as they did last month with a $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief bill.


Biden’s Democrats hold half the 100-seat Senate, claiming a majority thanks only to Vice President Kamala Harris’ tie-breaking vote.

A defection by Manchin or any other member could doom the bill’s chances in the weeks - or months - Congress debates it after it returns next week from a spring break.

Manchin narrowly won re-election in 2018 in an increasingly Republican-leaning state, which is home to some of the nation’s worst roads - which the infrastructure package could help fix - but also a coal industry that would lose subsidies under some of its proposals.

While raising concerns over reconciliation, Manchin did not specifically say if he would vote against the infrastructure bill in that scenario.

An aide to Manchin did not respond to requests for comment.

The White House said that it wanted to have “an open dialogue” with lawmakers.

“We continue to reach out not only to Senator Manchin but to senators on both sides of the aisle, and to members of the House on both sides of the aisle,” White House spokeswoman Kate Bedingfield told CNN.

Besides criticizing the process for debating the infrastructure bill, Manchin has objected to Biden’s call for raising the U.S. corporate tax rate to 28%, suggesting a 25% target as more appropriate.

The Republican-controlled Congress reduced it in 2017 from 35% to 21% as part of a sweeping tax reform.

More than a dozen White House and corporate officials interviewed by Reuters this week said they could live with a 25% rate.

Robust infrastructure investments could be an important source of new revenues for Manchin’s home state, where road and bridge conditions are among the worst in the country, according to an analysis of 2018 Federal Highway Administration data by TRIP, a nonprofit transportation group that examined the share of roads and bridges in each state that were in poor condition.

At the same time, West Virginia’s heavy reliance on fossil fuel industries means its companies could take a hit from Biden’s proposal to cut subsidies for oil, natural gas and coal companies to help pay for the infrastructure plan.

While Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer has a difficult balancing act in moving Biden’s initiatives through the evenly split Senate, Manchin walks a political tight-rope as well.

West Virginia is a deeply Republican state, having overwhelmingly voted for former President Donald Trump in 2016 and 2020.

Manchin is not up for re-election until 2024.

But he may be mindful that his winning percentage in 2018 was only 49.6 percent of the vote, down from his comfortable 60.6 percent in 2012.

Reporting by Richard Cowan, Jason Lange and Doina Chiacu; Editing by Scott Malone and Dan Grebler

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa- ... SKBN2BV2OW

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Re: POLITICS

Post by thelivyjr » Sat Apr 10, 2021 1:40 p

THE CAPE CHARLES MIRROR APRIL 9, 2021 AT 9:23 PM

Paul Plante says:

“It is therefore obvious to the least intelligent mind, to account why, great power in the hands of a magistrate, and that power connected, with a considerable duration, may be dangerous to the liberties of a republic — the deposit of vast trusts in the hands of a single magistrate, enables him in their exercise, to create a numerous train of dependents — this tempts his ambition, which in a republican magistrate is also remarked, to be pernicious and the duration of his office for any considerable time favors his views, give him the means and time to perfect and execute his designs — he therefore fancies that he may be great and glorious by oppressing his fellow citizens, and raising himself to permanent grandeur on the ruins of his country.”

Those are words from two hundred thirty-four (234) years ago at the time of our nation’s founding as a nation, as opposed to a collection of British colonies in rebellion against a foreign tyrant king, and they serve as a basis for why the early Americans were very concerned with how an American president was to be chosen, out of a valid fear for what we would be stuck with, as a result of poor political choices.

Those words are from the anti-federalist Cato IV political essay by Cato, believed to be George Clinton, the first governor of the state of New York, on November 8, 1787, and they are brought to mind in here by the ascension of Joe Biden, who claims to be a victim of white privilege, into the oval office.

We know that Joe is a victim of white privilege because we were told so by Joe his own self in a Business Insider article entitled “Biden admits at CNN town hall that he’s benefited from white privilege” by Oma Seddiq on Sep. 17, 2020, where we were regaled on the subject of Joe’s white privilege as follows by Joe, to wit:

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden on Thursday acknowledged that white privilege has worked in his favor.

“I’ve benefited just because I don’t have to go through what my Black brothers and sisters have had to go through,” Biden told CNN’s Anderson Cooper during a drive-in town hall at PNC Field in Moosic, Pennsylvania.

White privilege refers to the societal advantages that white people can reap because of their race.

This emerged as a hot-button issue as protests over racial injustice and police brutality swept the nation following the May 25 police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis.

end quotes

And there was Joe, right in there pandering away.

Which in turn takes us back to Obama Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan telling us in CHIAFALO ET AL. v. WASHINGTON about how the plan for electing U.S. presidents outlined by Alexander Hamilton in Federalist No. 68 failed to anticipate the rise of political parties, so that instead of having the best this country has to offer in the position of chief magistrate, we ended up with Joe Biden, instead, to wit:

The Amendment thus brought the Electoral College’s voting procedures into line with the Nation’s new party system.

end quotes

By way of review, the “amendment” in question there is the Twelfth Amendment, whose main part provided that electors would vote separately for President and Vice President.

The Amendment, ratified in 1804, says: “The Electors shall meet in their respective states and vote by ballot for President and Vice-President . . .; they shall name in their ballots the person voted for as President, and in distinct ballots the person voted for as Vice-President, and they shall make distinct lists of all persons voted for as President, and of all persons voted for as Vice-President, and of the number of votes for each, which lists they shall sign and certify, and transmit sealed to [Congress, where] the votes shall then be counted.”

end quotes

How Justice Kagan Amendment makes the intellectual leap to her belief that the Twelfth Amendment thus brought the Electoral College’s voting procedures into line with the Nation’s new party system is obscure, but nonetheless, she is the Supreme Court Justice, so even if that is dead wrong, it is still “law of the land” now, because in this country, history is not at all fixed, to the contrary, history is a putty-like substance that can be shaped and twisted in whatever form it needs to be to fulfull the needs of the moment.

Getting back to Justice Kagan, she spins history, as follows:

Within a few decades, the party system also became the means of translating popular preferences within each State into Electoral College ballots.

end quotes

What that really is saying is that within a few decades of 1804, the party system also became the means of translating popular preferences within each State into Electoral College ballots by totally perverting the system to put it into the hands of the major political factions, to the detriment of all those American citizens who do not cleave to the standard of either political faction.

And it is interesting that in her version of American political history, Justice Kagan has chosen to leave out the 1824 Presidential Election and the “Corrupt Bargain,” which, as we learned as American school children, marked the final collapse of the Republican-Federalist political framework.

For the first time no candidate ran as a Federalist, while five significant candidates competed as Democratic-Republicans.

Clearly, no party system functioned in 1824.

end quotes

Is that a salient point that Justice Kagan chose to leave out of her version of American history, that no party system functioned in 1824, and in fact, during the so-called Era of Good Feelings, which began in 1815 in the mood of victory that swept the nation at the end of the War of 1812, exaltation replaced the bitter political divisions between Federalists and Republicans, between northern and southern states, and between east-coast cities and settlers on the western frontier?

Getting back to the history Justice Kagan left out, the official candidate of the Democratic-Republicans to replace James Monroe was William H. Crawford, the secretary of the treasury.

A caucus of Republicans in Congress had selected him, but this backing by party insiders turned out to be a liability as other candidates called for a more open process for selecting candidates.

The outcome of the very close election surprised political leaders.

The winner in the all-important Electoral College was Andrew Jackson, the hero of the War of 1812, with ninety-nine votes.

He was followed by JOHN QUINCY ADAMS, the son of the second president and Monroe’s secretary of state, who secured eighty-four votes.

Meanwhile Crawford trailed well behind with just forty-one votes.

Although Jackson seemed to have won a narrow victory, receiving 43 percent of the popular vote versus just 30 percent for Adams, he would not be seated as the country’s sixth president.

Because nobody had received a majority of votes in the electoral college, the House of Representatives had to choose between the top two candidates.

Henry Clay, the speaker of the House of Representatives, now held a decisive position.

As a presidential candidate himself in 1824 (he finished fourth in the electoral college), Clay had led some of the strongest attacks against Jackson.

Rather than see the nation’s top office go to a man he detested, the Kentuckian Clay forged an Ohio Valley-New England coalition that secured the White House for John Quincy Adams.

In return Adams named Clay as his secretary of state, a position that had been the stepping-stone to the presidency for the previous four executives.

This arrangement, however, hardly proved beneficial for either Adams or Clay.

Denounced immediately as a “CORRUPT BARGAIN” by supporters of Jackson, the antagonistic presidential race of 1828 began practically before Adams even took office.

To Jacksonians the ADAMS-CLAY ALLIANCE symbolized a corrupt system where elite insiders pursued their own interests without heeding the will of the people.

end quotes

And today, that corrupt system where elite insiders like Bill and Hillary Clinton and Andy Cuomo of New York state pursue their own interests without heeding the will of the people is alive and well and rewarded us with a two-time loser named Joe Biden as our next president.

http://www.capecharlesmirror.com/news/o ... ent-342393

thelivyjr
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Re: POLITICS

Post by thelivyjr » Sun Apr 11, 2021 1:40 p

THE CAPE CHARLES MIRROR APRIL 10, 2021 AT 6:38 PM

Paul Plante says:

And before we go forward in here, let us for a moment go back to the 1824 Presidential Election and the “Corrupt Bargain,” and the fact that for the first time in our political history, no candidate ran as a Federalist, while five significant candidates competed as Democratic-Republicans, and let us focus in on the fact of FIVE candidates for president, and then let us ask ourselves this question, to wit: WAS THAT BY ACCIDENT THAT THERE WERE FIVE, OR IS THAT THE WAY IT WAS SUPPOSED TO BE?

And for some historical insight to what that answer should be, let us go back from there thirty-seven (37) years to 1787 and the anti-federalist Cato IV political essay by Cato, believed to be George Clinton, the first governor of the state of New York, on November 8, 1787, where we have as follows:

It is a maxim in republics, that the representative of the people should be of their immediate choice; but by the manner in which the president is chosen he arrives to this office at the fourth or fifth hand, nor does the highest vote, in the way he is elected, determine the choice — for it is only necessary that he should be taken from the highest of five, who may have a plurality of votes.

end quotes

Now, consider that in 1787, when Cato was alive, there was still a great debate going on in America as to whether the Constitution should be ratified, or not, so that salient points such as what Cato is saying about “for it is only necessary that he should be taken from the highest of five, who may have a plurality of votes” were a part of the public debate, so that we can clearly see that at the time of this nation’s founding, it was never supposed to be an either/or contest, where if we don’t get stuck with what the Democrats dished up, or dredged up in the case of Joe Biden, resurrecting him from their large pool of failed presidential contenders, then we get stuck with what the Republicans have dredged up, instead.

And the fact that in 1824, there were still five candidates for the office lends credence to what Cato was saying in 1787 about the “highest of the five.”

So what happened?

How come it’s only two now?

And how come only two political factions, neither of which represents a majority of the American people, get to be the ones that have an American president as part of their faction?

Or is it now seditious to ask that question in the troubled America of today?

http://www.capecharlesmirror.com/news/o ... ent-342627

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