THE POT BELLY STOVE ROOM

Take Off Your Coat and Sit For A Spell To Relax Your Mind
thelivyjr
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Re: THE POT BELLY STOVE ROOM

Post by thelivyjr » Sat Feb 01, 2020 1:40 p

STOCKBRIDGE, PAST AND PRESENT; OR, RECORDS OF AN OLD MISSION STATION., continued ...

SECTION XXVII.

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.

INDIVIDUALS PARTICULARLY ENGAGED IN ESTABLISHING AND SUSTAINING THE STOCKBRIDGE MISSION.

REV. WILLIAM WILLIAMS.


Rev. William Williams of Hatfield, was another follower of the Half-way Covenant practice, though he did not, like his sons, take up his pen in its defense.

He was the son of Isaac, and grandson of Robert Williams, and was born in Newton, February 2, 1665.

He graduated at Harvard in 1683, and settled at Hatfield in 1685, where he died, August 29, 1741.

His first wife was a daughter of Dr. Cotton, and his second a daughter of Rev. Solomon Stoddard of Northampton.

It is a curious circumstance, that this lady was the youngest daughter of the family, while his son, Rev. William Williams of Weston, married the eldest daughter.

Mr. Williams was considered by Dr. Chauncey to be a greater man than Mr. Stoddard.

In deportment, he was "humble and condescending," says one, while at the same time, he "commanded peculiar awe and respect."

Among his sons may be mentioned Elisha, Rector of Yale for a time, but afterwards much employed in offices of trust, by Great Britian.

Hon. William Williams, one of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence, was a grandson.

TO BE CONTINUED ...

thelivyjr
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Re: THE POT BELLY STOVE ROOM

Post by thelivyjr » Sun Feb 02, 2020 1:40 p

STOCKBRIDGE, PAST AND PRESENT; OR, RECORDS OF AN OLD MISSION STATION., continued ...

SECTION XXVII.

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.

INDIVIDUALS PARTICULARLY ENGAGED IN ESTABLISHING AND SUSTAINING THE STOCKBRIDGE MISSION.

REV. STEPHEN WILLIAMS, D. D.


Dr. Williams, born May 14, 1693, was the great-grandson of Robert, and the son of Rev. John Williams, the "Redeemed Captive."

He was, himself, one of the captives, and, being redeemed, returned to Boston, November 21, 1705.

He graduated at Harvard in 1713, and was ordained as the first pastor of Long Meadow, October 17, 1716, where he died, June 10, 1782, aged 88.

His wife was Abigail, daughter of Rev. John Davenport of Stamford, Connecticut.

They were married July 3, 1718, and had seven sons, all of whom followed their father to his grave.

Dr. Williams served as Chaplain in three campaigns, and in that capacity was with Col. Ephraim Williams at Lake George.

TO BE CONTINUED ...

thelivyjr
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Re: THE POT BELLY STOVE ROOM

Post by thelivyjr » Mon Feb 03, 2020 1:40 p

STOCKBRIDGE, PAST AND PRESENT; OR, RECORDS OF AN OLD MISSION STATION., continued ...

SECTION XXVIII.

EARLY FAMILIES.


The four families who settled here with Mr. Sergeant and Mr. Woodbridge, and a few who soon followed, may well receive, together with their immediate posterity, a particular notice; and in this genealogical era of the world, their ancestry, so far as it is known, must not be overlooked,

TIMOTHY WOODBRIDGE, ESQ, AND FAMILY.

The Woodbridges were descended from a line of protestant clergymen by the name of John Woodbridge, the first of whom was born about the time of the discovery of America, and the fifth of whom married the daughter of Rev. Robert Parker, and settled in Stanton, Wiltshire, England.

Mr. Parker is called by Mather, "one of the greatest scholars in the English Nation, and in some sort the father of all Nonconformists of our day."

Besides Mrs. Woodbridge, he had a son, Rev. Thomas Parker, first pastor of Newbury, Massachusetts, a man greatly distinguished for learning and piety, who died in April, 1677, aged about 81, and at least one daughter, the wife of Rev. Noyce, Puritan minister of Choulderton, Wiltshire, England.

Both Mr. Woodbridge and his wife were much esteemed, and their son John imitated their virtues, and, like them, embraced the Puritan Faith.

For this he was expelled from college, (Oxford,) and his uncle being then about to seek a home in the New World, he embarked with him, and arrived in Newbury in 1634.

On the death of his father, about eight years afterwards, he went over to England, and having settled the estate, brought back his brother Benjamin, who became one of the first graduates of Harvard, returned to England, succeeded Dr. Twiss at Newbury, in that country, and gained a high reputation for native talent, for learning and for piety; but was ejected with the mass of Puritan Divines in 1662, after which he ministered more privately, until his death at Inglefield, November 1, 1684.

Another brother left England with John W., but died during the passage.

TO BE CONTINUED ...

thelivyjr
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Re: THE POT BELLY STOVE ROOM

Post by thelivyjr » Tue Feb 04, 2020 1:40 p

STOCKBRIDGE, PAST AND PRESENT; OR, RECORDS OF AN OLD MISSION STATION., continued ...

SECTION XXVIII.

EARLY FAMILIES.

TIMOTHY WOODBRIDGE, ESQ, AND FAMILY.
, continued ...

When the Woodbridges reached America, the town of Andover was newly settled, and John was ordained as one of its pastors, September 16, 1644.

In 1647, however, he was induced to return once more to his native country, where, after acting as Chaplain to the Commissioners, treating with the King at the Isle of Wight, he was employed at Andover first, and then at Burford, St. Martins, in Wiltshire.

But in 1662, he also was ejected, and in 1663 he came again to America, bringing with him his wife and twelve children.

He was soon settled at Newbury, and when, some years afterward, he retired from the ministry, he was chosen as magistrate, and continued in public business until his death, March 17, 1695, when about the age of 82.

His character for patience, forgiveness, and other Christian virtues, is rarely equaled.

The wife of Mr. Woodbridge was Mercy Dudley, daughter of Thomas Dudley, Esq.

She was born September 27, 1621, came to America in 1630, was married in 1641, and died July 1, 1691, and is spoken of as a very excellent woman.

The Dudley family seem to have risen to power during the reign of Henry 7th, who conferred the title and estate of the Warwick family, then extinct, upon Edmond Dudley, a celebrated lawyer, and a Speaker in the House of Commons, born in 1442, and executed by request of the people, who hated him, in 1510.

John, his son, became Duke of Northumberland, and was the father of Ambrose, styled "The good Earl of Warwick," Lord Guilford, (the husband of Lady Jane Grey,) Robert, (Earl of Leicester,) the favorite of Elizabeth, and Lord of Kenilworth Castle, and of several others.

Northumberland was beheaded August 15, 1553, and with him Lord Guilford and Lady Jane.

Captain Roger Dudley, who died in the service of his country, was of the same family, and of the same generation with Northumberland, but how near of kin is not known.

He left a daughter and a son, Thomas, who, after being educated in the family of Northampton, studied law with Judge Nichols, a relative, and commenced practice, but received a commission from Elizabeth, went for a time on to the Continent, and, after his return, married Dorothy , a lady of some distinction, and settled in the vicinity ot Northamton.

There he became a Christian, and a non-conformist.

Through the influence of Lord Say and Seal, Lord Compton and others, he was soon employed by the Earl of Lincoln as Steward, and, except that he removed to Boston, and sat for a short time under the ministry of Dr. Cotton, Lincoln retained him in that office, and as his counsellor in all matters, until he sailed for the Massachusetts Bay Colony, April 7, arriving at two o'clock on Saturday, June 12, 1630.

He then held the office of Lieutenant Governor, and was afterwards repeatedly chosen to that office, and to that of Governor; residing first at Cambridge, for a short time at Ipswich, but for the longest period at Roxbury.

Born in 1574, he died July 31, 1653.

His first wife died February 27, 1643, and previous to 1645 he married Katharine, who survived him.

TO BE CONTINUED ...

thelivyjr
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Re: THE POT BELLY STOVE ROOM

Post by thelivyjr » Wed Feb 05, 2020 1:40 p

STOCKBRIDGE, PAST AND PRESENT; OR, RECORDS OF AN OLD MISSION STATION., continued ...

SECTION XXVIII.

EARLY FAMILIES.

TIMOTHY WOODBRIDGE, ESQ, AND FAMILY.
, continued ...

The children of the first wife were:

Rev. Samuel, born 1606, married Mary, daughter of Governor Winthrop, settled at Exeter in 1650, died before March 20, 1683.

His wife died at Salisbury, April 12, 1643.

Anne, a poet, and the wife of Governor Bradstreet, who died September 18, 1672.

Patience, who married Major General Daniel Dennison.

Mercy, Mrs. Woodbridge above mentioned, and Sarah, who married, first, Benjamin Keayne, and second, Pacy.

Those of the second wife were:

Deborah, born in Roxbury, February 27, 1645, and married to Wade.

Joseph, (Governor,) born September 23, 1647, who married a daughter of Edward Tyng, and Paul, and two others.

One daughter married a Mr. Page.

Of the twelve children of John and Mercy Woodbridge, one died young, and three were ministers, viz., John, Timothy, and Benjamin.

Benjamin settled first at Bristol, afterwards at Kittery, and died in Medford, January 15, 1710.

He married Mary Ward of Haverhill.

Timothy, born about 1653, settled in Hartford in 1695, had three wives, and died, April 30, 1732: great grandfather of the Geographer.

John graduated in 1664, settled in Killingworth in 1666, and in Wethersfield in 1679, and died in 1692.

His wife, Abigail , received a pension until 1701, probably the period of her death.

Two daughters of the family married clergymen, and several grandsons entered the ministry.

Among the children of John and Abigail Woodbridge were — Rev. Dudley Woodbridge, ordained in Simsbury, Connecticut, November 10, 1697, who married Dorothy Lamb of Roxbury, Massachusetts, and died August 3, 1710.

His widow married his successor, Timothy, son of Timothy of Hartford, and had several children.

Rev. Ephraim Woodbridge, born June 25, 1680, who married Hannah Morgan, May 4, 1704, and settled in the ministry at Groton.

Alary, who married the Rev. Mr. Ruggles of Suffield.

John, two years older than Ephraim, born in 1678, graduated in 1694, settled as the first pastor in West Springfield in 1698, and married, November 14, 1699, to Jemima Eliot.

He died June 10, 1718.

Esteemed for wisdom, learning and piety during his ministry, his death was felt to be a heavy blow to his ministerial brethren, as well as to his people.

Mrs. Woodbridge survived him, and spent some of her last years with her sons, Joseph and Timothy, in Stockbridge.

TO BE CONTINUED ...

thelivyjr
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Re: THE POT BELLY STOVE ROOM

Post by thelivyjr » Thu Feb 06, 2020 1:40 p

STOCKBRIDGE, PAST AND PRESENT; OR, RECORDS OF AN OLD MISSION STATION., continued ...

SECTION XXVIII.

EARLY FAMILIES.

TIMOTHY WOODBRIDGE, ESQ, AND FAMILY.
, continued ...

John Eliot, the Lidian Apostle, was the grandfather of Mrs. Woodbridge.

He was born at Nasing, near London, England, in 1604; assisted the distinguished Mr. Hooker as teacher in that country, was converted while in his family, led by his advice to enter the ministry, and finally he followed him into the western wilderness, arriving November 3, 1631.

He soon settled in Roxbury, having been selected by the people as their pastor while still in England, and Miss Anne Mountfort, a lady about his own age, having joined him according to agreement, they were married in November, 1632.

He commenced his labors among the Indians in 1646, delivering his first sermon in the hut of Waban on Nonantum hill, in Newton.

The site is still known, and an oak is yet standing on the spot, which, from its size, may be supposed to have thrown its shadow upon the group assembled.

Mr. Eliot established about twenty towns of "Praying Indians," fourteen of them of such distinction as to attract attention, framed for them a code of laws, formed churches, taught them the arts of civilized life, and translated for them the Holy Scriptures.

In 1687, March 22, Mrs. Eliot died, and May 21, 1690, her husband followed her.

Their children were:

Anne, born September 13, 1633, an estimable woman, who remained with her parents during their life.

Second, John, born August 31, 1636, died October 13, 1668, pastor of Newton.

Wives, Sarah, and Elizabeth, daughters of Daniel Gookin, Esq., the historian.

Third, Joseph, born December 20, 1638, the father of Mrs. Woodbridge.

Fourth, Samuel, born June 22, 1641, who died while fitting for the ministry.

He was eminent for talents and piety.

Fifth, Aaron, born February 19, 1643, who died very young, but pious; and;

Sixth, Benjamin, born June 29, 1646, his father's missionary assistant.

Of these sons, only Joseph survived his father.

Joseph Eliot was graduated in 1658, and after preaching for a time in Northampton, was settled in Guilford, Connecticut, 1664, and married, first, Sarah, daughter of Governor William Brenton of Rhode Island.

She died in Newport, in 1674, and Mr. Eliot, married second, Mary, daughter of Hon. Samuel Wyllys, (of Hartford,) and Ruth Haynes, his wife.

He is spoken of in history as "That burning and shining light," but his successful ministry was closed by death, May 24, 1694, and his wife died October 11, 1729, aged 73.

Samuel Wyllys died May 30, 1709; his daughter Mehitabel, married, first. Rev. Daniel Russell, of Charlestown, second. Rev. Isaac Foster of the first Church in Hartford, and it is said that a third husband was Rev. Timothy Woodbridge, his successor.

The father of Mr. Wyllys was Governor George Y., who " left a fine estate in England for the Gospel's sake," and came to America in 1638.

He brought over and planted on his estate in Hartford, the Apple-tree which still flourishes near the Charter Oak, that ground being a part of his farm.

By the order to hide the Charter, we find that the tree stood "in front of the dwelling of Hon. Samuel Wyllys," then one of the magistrates.

George died in March, 1641; Ifezekiah, his son, (Secretary Wyllys,) in 1734.

The secretaryship descended from father to son, continuing in the family for 98 successive years.

Samuel died May 30, 1709.

His wife Ruth Haynes, was daughter to John Haynes, from Essex County, England, who emigrated with Mr. Hooker in 1633, and after holding the office of Governor in Massachusetts, assisted in founding the Colony of Connecticut.

From 1639 to 1654, the date of his death, he was chosen Governor of Connecticut every alternate year, which was as often as the constitution would permit.

Joseph, his son, succeeded Mr. Hooker and Mr. Stone, in the First Church of Hartford.

TO BE CONTINUED ...

thelivyjr
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Re: THE POT BELLY STOVE ROOM

Post by thelivyjr » Fri Feb 07, 2020 1:40 p

STOCKBRIDGE, PAST AND PRESENT; OR, RECORDS OF AN OLD MISSION STATION., continued ...

SECTION XXVIII.

EARLY FAMILIES.

TIMOTHY WOODBRIDGE, ESQ, AND FAMILY.
, continued ...

Having thus given the parentage of Mrs. Joseph Eliot, we will return to her family, consisting of eight children, viz.:

First, Mehifabel, born October 1, 1676, and married to William Wilson.

She died April 19, 1723.

Second, Anna, born December 12, 1677, who married Jonathan Law of Milford, December 20, 1698, and died November 16, 1703.

Mr. Law was Judge of the Supreme Court, Chief Justice, Lieutenant Governor and Governor of Connecticut, and his sons and grandsons have also stood high in civil life.

Third, Jemima, (Mrs. John Woodbridge of West Springfield,) born in 1680.

Fourth, Bashua, born in 1682, who married Augustus Lucas of Fairfield.

Fifth, Jared, D. D., distinguished as a divine, a physician and a natural philosopher, who settled at Killingworth, and died in 1763, leaving a large family.

Sixth, Mary, born in 1687, and married first to Samuel Hart of Durham, second to Abraham Pierson of Clinton, Ct., third to Richard Treat of Wethersfield, and fourth to Mr. Hooker.

Seventh, Rebecca, born in 1690, who married, first John Trowbridge, October 26, 1710, second Mr. Fiske, third Deacon William Dudley of North Guilford, December 18, 1749.

She died February 9, 1782; and Eighth, Obiel, who married Mary, daughter of John Leet of Guilford.

We have now given the ancestry of Timothy Woodbridge of Stockbridge, son of Rev. John Woodbridge of West Springfield, and Jemima Eliot his wife, so far as we have been able to gather it.

His brothers were five in number, and his sisters two, viz.

First, Abigail, born December 22, 1700, was married to John Mixer, October 30, 1734.

Childless.

Second, Tom, born December 25, 1702, was settled first at Pequonnac in 1729, and was installed in South Hadley in 1742.

He died in 1783.

His first wife was Miss Ruggles of New Jersey, by whom he had two sons, John, and Col. Ruggles Woodbridge, member of the Legislature for many years, an energetic and excellent man.

The second wife was Miss Clark of Belchertown.

She had five children, one of whom was the father of Rev. John Woodbridge of Old Hadley, Rev. Sylvester W., and Mindwell, the wife of Mr. Gould of Southampton.

A daughter married Rev. Joseph Strong, and was the mother of Prof. Strong of Rutgers College, Dr. W. Strong of Boston, and Dr. M. Strong of Rochester.

Of her daughters, one married a son of President Dwight, another Professor Avery of Hamilton College, and a third Dr. Bogert of the Sailor's Snug Harbor.

The first missionary to California was also a descendant of Rev. J. W. of South Hadley.

Third, Jahleel, born Dec. 11, 1704 ; died, April 27, 1705.

Fourth, Joseph, born Feb. 10, 1807; will have a separate notice.

Timothy, born Feb. 27, 1709, was the fifth child.

Sixth, Benjamin, born Feb. 14, 1711; died March 23, of the same year.

Seventh, Benjamin, born June 15, 1712, was settled in Amity, Ct., now called Woodbridge in honor of him.

He was a man of great shrewdness and wit, and many of his sayings are remembered to this day.

He also possessed to an unusual degree the affection and confidence of his people.

He died Dec. 24, 1785, aged 73.

Eighth, Jemima, born June 30, 1717, married Mr. Nicholson, a merchant, and removed to New Jersey; but after his death she joined her brothers in Stockbridge, and for several summers taught a school of small children in Goodrich street.

As has been observed, the mother also removed to Stockbridge, and thus this place became, rather than any other, the home of the family.

TO BE CONTINUED ...

thelivyjr
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Re: THE POT BELLY STOVE ROOM

Post by thelivyjr » Sat Feb 08, 2020 1:40 p

STOCKBRIDGE, PAST AND PRESENT; OR, RECORDS OF AN OLD MISSION STATION., continued ...

SECTION XXVIII.

EARLY FAMILIES.

TIMOTHY WOODBRIDGE, ESQ, AND FAMILY.
, concluded ...

Timothy was, strictly speaking, the first white inhabitant of missionary Stockbridge.

He was also the first deacon in the church, the first magistrate in the town, and the Superintendent of Indian Affairs, for which service he received from England a crown a day.

He was Judge of his Majesty's Inferior Court, and after 1761, was Judge both of Probate and Common Pleas.

Just before his death, which occurred May 11, 1774, he was chosen as member of the Governor's Council by mandamus from the King, but declined the office.

His docket, an antique relic indeed, was destroyed by a fire which occurred in Vergennes, Vt., in 1846.

Mr. Woodbridge built first on the South side of the road, a short distance to the East of the house of Mr. Stephen W. Jones; but he afterwards built on the site now occupied by Mr. Samuel Goodrich.

He was Married in 1736 to Miss Abigail Day of West Springfield, whose father, Samuel Day, born May 20, 1671, was married in 1697 to Marah Dumbleton.

The parents of Samuel Day were Thomas and Sarah Day.

Mrs. Woodbridge was born March, 17, 1713, and died Dec. 4, 1772.

Her children were:

Abigail, born in West Springfield in 1737, who married Mr. Townsend of New Haven.

Second, Sybil, born about 1743, who Married Capt. William Goodrich, and settled in Stockbridge, where she died Jan. 21, 1782, aged 39.

Her children were first, Experience; and William, who died June 10, 1771, aged 9 years.

Mrs. Goodrich died June 21, 1782, aged 39.

Third, Silvia, born about 1745, who married Capt. Phineas Morgan from Springfield, settled in Stockbridge, and died Dec. 3, 1806.

Her son, Miles Morgan, settled in West Stockbridge, had a large family, but buried five of them in the church-yard in this place.

He died Oct. 8, 1842, aged 64, his father, May 26, aged 79, his mother, Dec. 3, 1806.

Fourth, Timothy, who died young.

Fifth, William, who married Martha, daughter of Joseph Patterson of Richmond, and moved at an early date to that part of New Haven, Vt., now included in Waltham; and from thence to Madrid, N.Y.

His children were, first, Abigail, married Mr. Stockman of Vergennes, Vt., and had six children; second, Electa, married to Abel Allen of Ferrisburg, and died in New York, leaving two children; third, William, married to Betsey Whitney and had several children; fourth, Sereno, who married and had one child; fifth, Lucy, married, first, to Potter Scranton of Vermont, second, to Mr. Thompson, with whom she moved to Canada — she had children by both marriages; sixth, Martha, married to William Whitney, had three children; and seventh, John Eliot, who married in Madrid rather late in life.

Sixth, Enoch, born Dec. 25, 1750, married Nancy Winchell of Oblong, N.Y., in 1774, and had children — first, Timothy, born Aug. 16, 1775, and married to Lydia Chipman, July 3, 1801; second, Enoch, born May 15, 1777, died Sept. 19, 1778; third, Enoch Day, born July 16, 1779, married Clara Strong of Vergennes, Oct. 12, 1806, was several times representative from that city to the Legislature, twice County Senator, three years Mayor, and during the same period Chief Judge of the City Court, and died July 17, 1853; fourth, Sophia, born Apr. 30, 1784, married to Isaac Hopkins of Hopkinton, 1812; fifth, Harriet, born Apr. 25, 1786, married to Benjamin W. Hopkins; sixth, Nancy, born Aug. 30, 1788, married to Thomas Geer, Feb. 22, 1810; seventh, Betsey, born July 5, 1790, married to Ville Lawrence of Vergennes, Dec. 4, 1814, died Nov. 23, 1830; and eighth, Sally Maria, born Jan. 30, 1796, married to Henry Weed, July 4, 1821.

Enoch, (the elder) died Apr. 25, 1805, his first wife, May 11, 1800, and his second, Sabria Hopkins, (married Jan. 1, 1802) Jan. 5, 1807.

He was graduated at Yale in 1774, but soon entered the army, was an adjutant in General Patterson's brigade.

As Lieutenant Woodbridge, connected with Arnold's volunteer command at Ticonderoga and Crown Point in 1775, he is known in history.

He stood by the side of Montgomery when he fell at Quebec, returned from thence in 1776, was at the battles of Hubbardton and Bennington, and at the taking of Burgoyne, was wounded at White Plains, and continued in the army until the close of the war, 1783, the latter part of the time as Commissary, stationed at Albany and Bennington.

After the close of the war, he removed from Stockbridge and commenced practice in Pownal, Vt.

Thence he removed to Manchester, but finally settled in Vergennes, of which city he was the first Mayor, representing it, also, for many years in the Legislature, after which he was Chief Judge of the Supreme Court of the State.

He maintained the character of a man of strict integrity and true benevolence,"and," says one, "may be said to have died without an enemy."

Seventh, Electa, who married Colonel Stephen Pearl of Stockbridge, Nov. 5, 1773.

Eighth, Lucy, who married Ephraim Grant of Tolland, Ct., Oct. 14, 1772; no children.

Eunice Woodbridge of Stockbridge, married Dr. Samuel Lee of Great Barrington, Jan. 21, 1762, and Samuel Woodbridge, married Mary Nicholson of Stockbridge, July 15, 1765; but their names do not appear on the record furnished by Hon. Enoch D. Woodbridge of Vergennes.

TO BE CONTINUED ...

thelivyjr
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Re: THE POT BELLY STOVE ROOM

Post by thelivyjr » Sun Feb 09, 2020 1:40 p

STOCKBRIDGE, PAST AND PRESENT; OR, RECORDS OF AN OLD MISSION STATION., continued ...

SECTION XXVIII.

EARLY FAMILIES.

JOSEPH WOODBRIDGE AND FAMILY.


As Joseph was a brother of Timothy, his ancestry may be found under the same head.

He was born Feb. 10, 1707, and, May 10, 1730, married Mrs. Elizabeth Barnard, cousin to Mrs. Timothy Woodbridge.

Her former husband was Joseph Barnard.

They were published Dec. 30, 1721, and he died Dec. 3, 1728.

Their children were:

First, Elizabeth, born Jan. 18, 1702-3, and married in Stockbridge, Oct., 1787, to Rev. Thomas Strong, first pastor of New Marlborough.

She had seven children — Elizabeth, born Dec. 12, 1788, married Rev. E. Steele of Egremont; Jerusha, born March 21, 1750; Joseph, born Feb. 3, 1752, married Xena Jackson of Tyringham, (afterwards Mrs. Dr. Catlin of New Marlborough;)Ashbel, bom Jan. 10, 1754; Persis, born Feb. 1), 1756; Lucina, born May 31, 1758 ; Lucina Mehitable, born Dec. 3, 1761.

Mrs. Strong died Dec. 24, 1761.

Second, Mary, born Sept. 25, 1724.

Third, Sarah, born Sept. 20, 1726.

Fourth, Joseph, born May 20, 1729.

He moved from Stockbridge after 1754.

After her marriage with Mr. Woodbridge, Mrs. Barnard had five children.

The first two were born in West Springfield, and the others probably in Wethersfield, Ct., to which place the family removed.

These children were:

First, Jemima, born Feb. 28, 1731, married to Jacob Cooper of Stockbridge.

Second, Isabella, born Jan. 16, 1733, married to Zenas Parsons.

Third, Mabel, born Feb. 13, 1735, married to Captain Josiah Jones.

Fourth, Jahleel, born about 1738, married to Lucy, daughter of President Edwards.

Fifth, Stephen, who died when a youth, and of whom we have no dates.

Mr. Woodbridge came to Stockbridge when Jahleel was at the age of eleven months.

He lived first on the site now occupied by Stephen W. Jones.

The exact situation of the house is now covered by the garden of Mr. Jones.

Traces of the well, the cellar, and even of the ash-heap may still be seen.

Subsequently he built on the corner now occupied by Mr. Stanton, the house standing a few rods south of that of Mr. Stanton.

It was of one story, and painted red.

The "Settle Lot," of Mr. Woodbridge, as conveyed to Jolm Willard, July 5, 1750, was bounded "Northwesterly, partly by a highway, and partly by David Pixley's land, northeasterly by the marsh or mill pond, southeasterly and southerly by the lines originally run in laying out said lot; and was sold for £2500 Old Tenor Bills, well and truly paid."

Tradition says that he and Mr. Willard exchanged land.

Probably he first sold to Mr. Willard and built near his brother on Goodrich street, and afterwards, by exchange, regained his old government grant.

Certain it is that there his last days were spent.

Of the date of his death, or that of his wife, we have been able to find no record.

We only know that he lived after the Revolutionary war.

TO BE CONTINUED ...

thelivyjr
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Re: THE POT BELLY STOVE ROOM

Post by thelivyjr » Mon Feb 10, 2020 1:40 p

STOCKBRIDGE, PAST AND PRESENT; OR, RECORDS OF AN OLD MISSION STATION., continued ...

SECTION XXVIII.

EARLY FAMILIES.

JOSEPH WOODBRIDGE AND FAMILY.


Before giving the statistics of his posterity, we will insert the little we possess concerning the ancestry of Mrs. Woodbridge.

She was born Nov. 1, 1697, being ten years older than her husband, and was the daughter of John Merrick, born Dec. 9, 1658, and his wife, Mary Day, born Dec. 15, 1666, both of Springfield, and married Feb. 11, 1686-7.

Mr. Merrick was the son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Tilley) Merrick, married Nov. 21, 1650; and Mrs. Mary (Day) Merrick was the daughter of Thomas and Sarah Day, all of Springfield.

Thomas Merrick emigrated from Wales to Koxbury, and thence to Springfield with Mr. Pynchon in 1686.

He was the father of James Merrick, and doubtless of Thomas.

The Days were early inhabitants of West Springfield, where the family still remains.

Of the name of Tilley, we only know that Edward and John Tilley brought over families in the May Flower, and both died in Plymouth before the opening of Spring.

TO BE CONTINUED ...

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