THE POT BELLY STOVE ROOM

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thelivyjr
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Re: THE POT BELLY STOVE ROOM

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HISTORY OF WARREN COUNTY WITH ILLUSTRATIONS AND BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF SOME OF ITS PROMINENT MEN AND PIONEERS, continued ...

EDITED BY H. P. SMITH

1885

CHAPTER XXV. HISTORY OF THE PATENT AND TOWN OF QUEENSBURY., continued ...

MUNICIPAL HISTORY., continued ...

Incorporation., continued ...

Before the close of the war, and on the 31st of May, 1864, the village was the scene of an appalling calamity.

A fire so destructive as to nearly wipe out the business portion of the place swept over the village, leaving but three of the numerous stores and but little of the manufacturing portion of the village.

The loss reached about half a million dollars.

For a full account of this conflagration, the reader is referred to the chapter on the press of the county, where will be found a fac simile of the first issue of the Messenger after the fire, in which is printed a detailed account of the event.

There were not wanting among the inhabitants of Glens Falls those who looked upon this disastrous fire as a blessing disguised; such was the case even among some enterprising men who were actual heavy losers in dollars and cents.

A large number of buildings were destroyed which were anything but an ornament to the place, and which otherwise would have stood for years; these were succeeded by the handsome structures of the present day, many wooden buildings being displaced by substantial brick structures, and the general appearance and character of the business portion of the village was vastly improved.

The leading and most energetic men of the place came to the front and building after building arose in rapid succession, while business was carried on in the mean time by the most ingenious make-shifts.

In short the disaster which, in a less enterprising community would have paralyzed the industries of the place, seemed here only to fire anew the energetic people and general prosperity was scarcely interrupted.

Within a few years after the close of the war railroad agitation began, resulting in the building of the road connecting the village with Fort Edward and the outer world, which gave an added impetus to the growth of the place; this was supplemented at a later date by the extension of the road to Lake George, as elsewhere described.

From the era of rebuilding after the great fire, the growth of Glens Falls has been uninterrupted to the present time; to-day it is one of the most thrifty, enterprising and rapidly growing villages in the State, while in its just claims to natural and artificial beauty, it is not often surpassed.

Its population, exclusive of its suburbs, is about 7,000, and with the natural suburb of South Glens Falls (connected with this village by the bridge across the Hudson) and other surroundings that may almost be considered as belonging to the place, the number of inhabitants approaches ten thousand.

The succeeding description of the present manufacturing and mercantile interests and other institutions will give the reader an intelligent idea of the village in all of its various aspects.

TO BE CONTINUED ...
thelivyjr
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Re: THE POT BELLY STOVE ROOM

Post by thelivyjr »

HISTORY OF WARREN COUNTY WITH ILLUSTRATIONS AND BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF SOME OF ITS PROMINENT MEN AND PIONEERS, continued ...

EDITED BY H. P. SMITH

1885

CHAPTER XXV. HISTORY OF THE PATENT AND TOWN OF QUEENSBURY., continued ...

MUNICIPAL HISTORY., continued ...

Incorporation., continued ...

Some of the men who have been most conspicuous in contributing to the growth and prosperity of Glens Falls have already been mentioned in these pages; but many have not, nor can all be in any detail; but it will not be out of place to speak of a few of the most prominent.

Such are Augustus Sherman, Halsey R. Wing, John Folsom, William McDonald and his son, L.G. McDonald, John Keenan, Jonathan M. and Thomas S. Coolidge, Daniel Peck, Jerome Lapham, Rev. R.M. Little, Samuel Pruyn, James and A.W. Morgan, William W. Rockwell, William McEchron, William H. Gayger, the several Haviland families; Fred. A. Johnson, Keyes P. Cool, Hon. E.H. Rosekrans, W.E. Spier, and a host of younger men now engaged in mercantile business or manufacturing, and professional men whose labors in other directions have been no less potent for the general good of the community.

Following is a list of the presidents of the village from its incorporation to the present time, embracing the names of many men additional to the above, whose energies and influence have contributed substantially to the growth and welfare of the place: Ezra Benedict, 1857; William Briggs, 1845, '48; Daniel V. Brown, 1861; Stevens Carpenter, 1846; James C. Clark, 1853; George Conery, 1864; Jonathan M. Coolidge, 1883; Daniel H. Cowles, 1859; Zopher I. Delong, 1863; James Ferguson, 1862, '66; John A. Ferriss, 1839; Henry E. Fickett, 1858; Stephen L. Goodman, 1865; George G. Hawley, 1849; Richard W Higby, 1850-52; Frederick A. Johnson, jr., 1870; John Keenan, 1871, '76, '77, '84; S.D. Kendrick, 1880, '81, '85; Jerome Lapham, 1867, '74; William McEachron, 1872; Joseph Mead, 1869; Alonzo W. Morgan, 1854; James Palmeter, 1840; S.A. Parks, 1877; Daniel Peck, 1868; Hiram Roberts, 1860; E.H. Rosekrans, 1855; James W. Schenck, 1856; Melville A. Sheldon, 1873; Henry Spencer, 1841, '42, '44; William E Spier, 1881; Samuel S. Tallmadge, 1843; Jarvis A. Underwood, 1878; Abraham Wing, 1847.

Following is a list of the clerks of the corporation from its formation to the present time: Adam Armstrong, jr., 1868; Louis M. Brown, 1885; Alvin R. Carpenter, 1869; George W. Cheney, 1865; Isaac J. Davis, 1856, '59, '60; C.J. Delong, 1878-80; A. Hackley Fennel, 1867; Orange Ferriss, 1839-42; Emery D. Harris, 1861-66; Henry C. Hay, 1858; D.F. Keefe, 1876; Isaac Mott, 149-54; J.F. Patterson, 1874,75; Charles R Patterson,1884; Charles Peck, 1843, '45; Joseph S. Ferine, 1855; Ira A. Perrin, 1843; Frederic E. Ranger, 1857; E.R. Safford, 1881-83; John A. Sheldon, 1870-73; Allen T. Wilson, 1846-48.

TO BE CONTINUED ...
thelivyjr
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Re: THE POT BELLY STOVE ROOM

Post by thelivyjr »

HISTORY OF WARREN COUNTY WITH ILLUSTRATIONS AND BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF SOME OF ITS PROMINENT MEN AND PIONEERS, continued ...

EDITED BY H. P. SMITH

1885

CHAPTER XXV. HISTORY OF THE PATENT AND TOWN OF QUEENSBURY., continued ...

MUNICIPAL HISTORY., continued ...

Incorporation., concluded ...

The following list gives the names of all who have held the office of village trustee and embraces a large majority of the prominent men of the place since the incorporation: Ezra Benedict, 1850, '51, '57; Wm. Briggs, 1845, '46, '48, '57; Erastus Bronson, 1840, '41; Wm. C. Bronson, 1843; Daniel V. Brown, 1850-52, '61, '69; Cyrus Burnham, 1844; H.H. Bush, 1878, '79; James Buswell, 1853; Charles R. Cameron, 1866, '68, '75. 76; A.R. Carpenter, 1877, '78; Stevens Carpenter, 1846; Albert N. Cheney, 1846; James C. Clark, 1848, '53; Sanford Coffin, 1880; Thomas Coffin, 1845; George Conery, 1861, '62, '64, '68; Joseph B. Cool, 1855; Keyes P. Cool, 1840; Thomos S. Coolidge, 1870; William Cosgrove, 1868; Daniel A. Cowles, 1863, '59; H.S. Crittenden, 1874; Henry Crandell, 1874; George Cronkhite, 1839, '44; Wm. Cronkhite, 1858; Enos C. Crosby, 1847; David M. Dean, 1843, '48; C.J. Delong, 1875; Theodore S. Delong, 1869; Zopher I. Delong, 1862, '63, '73; Martin Eastwood, 1850; Enoch Ellis, 1842; Henry Ferguson, 1844, '50-52; James Ferguson, 1858, '61, '62, '66; John A. Ferriss, 1839; Henry E. Fickett, 1858; James C. Finch, 1856; Joseph Fowler, 1879; Stephen L. Goodman, 1865; Stephen Goodspeed, 1842; Enoch Gray, 1860; Joel B. Green, 1863, '66; Hiram M. Harris, 1871, '72; Ezra Hartman, 1876, '77; George G. Hawley, 1849, '54; John C. Higby, 1847; Richard W. Higby, 1847, '50, '51, '52; S.W. Higgins, 1882, '83; Alfred Hitchcock, 1858; A.F. Hitchcock, 1879, '80; C.H. Hitchcock, 1883, '84; Dwight Hitchcock, 1841,'42; Dewitt C. Holman, 1865, '82; Ezekiel Holman, 1846; William Hoskins, 1864; Theodore Hotchkiss, 1870; Edwin Hubbard, 1855; Frederick A. Johnson, jr., 1870; Daniel F. Keefe, 1869; John Keenan, 1863, '66, '71, '72; John L. Kenworthy, 1853; Ruliff Kipp, 1864, '70; Isaac Knapp, 1849; Hiram Krum, 1863, '77, '78; Benjamin F. Lapham, 1865; Henry G. Lapham, 1873; Jerome Lapham, 1851, '57, '71, 72; Harmon R. Leavins, 1869, '71, '72, '79, '80; Gardiner T. Lewis, 1863; Meredith B. Little, 1865, '71; Ira Locke, 1855; Leonard G. McDonald, 1857; William McDonald, 1843; William McEachron, 1867, '71, '72; A. McMullen, 1876, '77; Donald McNeil, 1847; Joseph Mead, 1867, '69; Alonzo W. Morgan, 1841, '48, '54, '70; Isaac Mott, 1859; Henry Nesbitt, 1868; Josiah Norris, 1849; George Norton, 1861, '62, '75; Daniel Numan, 1861, '62; James Palmeter, 1840; Bethuel Peck, 1843; Charles Peck, 1848; Daniel Peck, 1864, '67, '68, '84; William Peck, 1845, '49; Walter Phelps, jr., 1858; Samuel Pruyn, 1874; Marquis C. Rich, 1859, '60; Calvin Robbins, 1839; David Roberts, 1840, '41; David G. Roberts, 1845, '66, '75. '76; Hiram Roberts, 1856, '60, '64; Frederic W. Robinson, 1854; Enoch H. Rosekrans, 1855; James W. Schenck, 1852, '56; Nathaniel Shaw, 1846; Nehemiah Shaw, 1847; Melville A. Sheldon, 1873; George Shippey, 1856; George W. Sisson, 1865; James Sisson, 1838, '44, '45, '52, '56; O.C. Smith, 1883, '84; John Somers, 1854; Henry Spencer, 1841, '42, '44; Benjamin C. Starbuck, 1855; Samuel S. Tallmadge, 1843; Archibald C. Tearse, 1857, '59, '60, '64, '67; Berry Thompson, 1842; George J. Tillotson, 1853; William Wait, 1873; James Wells, 1840; Martin L. Wilmarth, 1859, '60, '80; John W. Wilson, 1839; L.G. Wilson, 1882, '83; Abraham Wing, 1847.

Following are the village officers for the year 1885: President, S.D. Kendrick; trustees, Daniel Peck, Daniel Corbet, John B. De Long, and Merchant H. Bradt; treasurer, Stowell B. Whitney; collector, Edward Dougherty; Assessor, Charles Parsons.

TO BE CONTINUED ...
thelivyjr
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Re: THE POT BELLY STOVE ROOM

Post by thelivyjr »

HISTORY OF WARREN COUNTY WITH ILLUSTRATIONS AND BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF SOME OF ITS PROMINENT MEN AND PIONEERS, continued ...

EDITED BY H. P. SMITH

1885

CHAPTER XXV. HISTORY OF THE PATENT AND TOWN OF QUEENSBURY., continued ...

MUNICIPAL HISTORY., continued ...

Post-offices. —The first post-office was established at Glens Falls on the first of January, 1808.

Previous to that time the nearest office was at Sandy Hill and the inhabitants at this place were compelled to go there for mail privileges.

The list of postmasters at Glens Falls was furnished to Dr. Holden by a friend in Washington, as they appear below, and with the list he enclosed the following information: "In examining the old books some doubt has arisen whether 'Glenville' was not the original name; but, as no change of name is found, it is presumed that Glens Falls was established, or commenced rendering 1st January, 1808."

"Unfortunately, the fire which destroyed the building in 1836 consumed three of the oldest books, which makes it difficult to trace the exact date of many of the old offices; but this is believed to be correct."

Dr. Holden adds that this statement is corroborated by the recollection of several persons, among whom may be mentioned the late Wing and Judge Hay.

The first post-office was established in a wooden building, the first structure erected on the southeast corner of Glen and Warren streets.

Judge Hay, whose father erected the building, wrote Dr. Holden that "at the time of Emmons's appointment (1816), James Henderson became postmaster at the Oneida, but whether he was the first one appointed there I know not.''

Following are the successive postmasters at Glens Falls: John H. Ferriss, 1808; Adonijah Emmons, 1816; Horatio Buell, 1818; John A. Ferriss, 1823; Ira A. Paddock, 1829; Jabez Briggs, 1835; Jonathan W. Freeman, 1841; Henry Philo, 1843; James Palmeter, 1845; Eleazer S. Vaughn, 1848; Stephen I. Williams, 1849; William Peck, 1853; Daniel Peck, 1856; Hiram M. Harris, 1860; John L. Kenworthy, 1861; Carlos Morgan, 1863; W.H. Van Cott, 1881; H.S. Crittenden, the present incumbent, appointed 1885.

TO BE CONTINUED ...
thelivyjr
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Re: THE POT BELLY STOVE ROOM

Post by thelivyjr »

HISTORY OF WARREN COUNTY WITH ILLUSTRATIONS AND BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF SOME OF ITS PROMINENT MEN AND PIONEERS, continued ...

EDITED BY H. P. SMITH

1885

CHAPTER XXV. HISTORY OF THE PATENT AND TOWN OF QUEENSBURY., continued ...

MUNICIPAL HISTORY., continued ...

Present Attorneys. — In the preceding pages of the present chapter, and in the earlier chapter devoted to the Bench and Bar of the county, the reader has already become familiar with the names and careers of the members of the legal profession who have at various times engaged in the counsels and forensic contests of Glens Falls.

The present attorneys of the place are E.L. Ashley, J.H. Bain, Stephen Brown, L.M. Brown, William M. Cameron, A.J. Cheritree, C.S. Enches, H.A. Howard, Daniel F. Keefe, Charles F. King, H. P. King, J. J. Mead, Isaac Mott, Charles R. Patterson, E. R. Safford, M.A. Sheldon, E.L. Stearns and F.H. Streeter.

The attorney of longest standing in the village is Isaac Mott, who came here in January, 1850.

He began the study of law in Glens Falls with Judge William Hay in 1838, was admitted to practice in 1844, at Utica, and practiced in Schuylerville until 1849.

He was obliged, with others, to compete with Stephen Brown several years later.

Mr. Brown was graduated at the Ballston Law School a short time before he opened an office in Glens Falls.

H.A. Howard was admitted at Albany in May, 1867, after passing the necessary period of clerkship in Windsor, Vt, and completing a course of study at the Albany Law School.

Immediately after his admission to practice he came here and has practiced with distinguished success ever since.

He is now serving the county in a second term as district attorney.

M.A. Sheldon was admitted at Lake George in 1852.

He began his law studies at the Ballston Law School a number of years before, and passed his clerkship in the office of Judge A.C. Hand, of Elizabethtown.

He practiced in Ticonderoga from 1852 to January 1st, 1868, at which time he removed to Glens Falls.

Judge Andrew J. Cheritree was born in Greeneville, Greene county.

He received his early education in the Greeneville Academy; studied law in the office of Abraham Becker, in South Worcester, Otsego county; was admitted at Morrisville, Madison county, in 1852; came to Luzerne, in this county, in 1854.

From there he removed to Glens Falls in 1869.

He is now, and since 1882 has been county judge and surrogate of Warren county, and for nine months preceding the election in 1882, held the position under the appointment of the governor.

Daniel F. Keefe was admitted at Schenectady in 1869, after taking the prescribed course of study in the office of Davis & Harris, in Glens Falls.

He commenced practicing here in the spring of 1870.

Edwin R. Safford graduated at the Albany Law School in June, 1874.

For the first five or six years he practiced as clerk in the office of Brown & Sheldon, of this place.

Since leaving them he has continued his practice alone.

Calhoun S. Enches has practiced here since his admission in January, 1876.

Previously he had read with Armstrong & Keefe, and with Judge Davis. H. Prior King, after reading law at Warrensburgh and with Judge Davis at Glens Falls, was admitted at Albany in January, 1878.

He has practiced here ever since.

J.H. Bain was admitted in 1873 at Iowa City, la., after completing a course of study in the law department of the University of Iowa.

He practiced four years in West Liberty, Iowa, and then, in 1878, removed to Glens Falls.

Charles R. Patterson divided his clerkship between R.C. Kellogg, of Elizabethtown, and Hon. Warren S. Kelly, of Albany, and was graduated at the Albany Law School in May, 1878.

He then practiced in Elizabethtown until February, 1879, when he came to Glens Falls.

E.L. Stearns passed the examination at the General Term of the Supreme Court held in Saratoga in September, 1879.

He had previously studied with H.A. Howard, of this place.

In 1881 he was elected justice of the peace and was re-elected in the spring of 1885.

Frank H. Streeter was admitted at Albany in 1880, since which time he has been in practice in Glens Falls.

J.J. Mead read law in the office of Isaac J. Davis, of Glens Falls, and was graduated from the legal department of Union University, May 25th, 1883.

He came here at once and opened an office.

After studying law with Brown & Sheldon, and subsequently with Stephen Brown, L.M. Brown was admitted at Saratoga in September, 1883.

Since his admission he has practiced in company with his father, under the firm name of S. & L.M. Brown.

Charles F. King was admitted in the same class with Mr. Brown.

He had previously studied with Thomas Cunningham, of Warrensburgh, and later with Stephen Brown.

He is now clerk in the office of S. & L.M. Brown.

William M. Cameron was admitted in the fall of 1884 at Saratoga.

He passed his clerkship with A. Dallas Wait, ex-judge of Washington county.

He came to Glens Falls in the spring of 1885.

Eugene L. Ashley passed a clerkship with M.A. Sheldon, of this place, and was admitted in January, 1885.

TO BE CONTINUED ...
thelivyjr
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Re: THE POT BELLY STOVE ROOM

Post by thelivyjr »

HISTORY OF WARREN COUNTY WITH ILLUSTRATIONS AND BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF SOME OF ITS PROMINENT MEN AND PIONEERS, continued ...

EDITED BY H. P. SMITH

1885

CHAPTER XXV. HISTORY OF THE PATENT AND TOWN OF QUEENSBURY., continued ...

MUNICIPAL HISTORY., continued ...

Present Physicians. —The introductory remark concerning the early history of the legal profession in Glens Falls will apply in this division, the early physicians having been properly referred to in the previous pages of this chapter and in the general chapter on the medical fraternity.

The physicians at present practicing in the village are: Drs. A.O. Ameden, C.S. Barney, David Bullard, F.L.R. Chapin, H.W. Coffin, R.J. Eddy, James Ferguson, D.J. Fitzgerald, C.A. Foster, W. Garfield, A.W. Holden, Hamilton Holliday, G.W. Little, Godfrey R. Martine, G.W. Nyce, Buel G. Streeter and Fred B. Streeter.

Dr. James Ferguson is a graduate of the medical college formerly situated at Castleton, Vt, which endowed him with a degree in 1841.

From then until 1852 he practiced at Schoharie, N.Y., and at the latter date removed to Glen Falls.

He owned the Prospect Mountain House at Caldwell, which was burned in 1880, and rebuilt as the Ferguson Mountain House.

Dr. David Bullard was graduated at the Albany Medical College in 1849.

In 1856 he was converted to the principles of the Homoeopathic school.

He practiced in Fulton county until i860, the date of his arrival at Glens Falls.

Dr. F.L.R. Chapin was graduated from the Albany Medical College in 1851.

He practiced in Albany until 1865 (excepting two years in which he was in the war) and from 1853 to 1861 was demonstrator of anatomy in the college of which he is a graduate.

In 1865 he came to Glens Falls where he has continued to the present.

Dr. Buel G. Streeter was graduated at the Medical College at Castleton, Vt., in 1853, and located at Granville, Washington county, N.Y.

He took an active part in the Rebellion, and filled a number of prominent medical and surgical positions.

After the war he came to Glens Falls.

Dr. R.J. Eddy was graduated at the medical department of the University of Vermont at Burlington, in 1868.

He first practiced in Salisbury, Vt, then at Bristol in the same State, and came to Glens Falls in 1872.

Dr. A.O. Ameden also received his medical education at the medical department of the University of Vermont.

He first practiced at Patten's Mills in Washington county about three years; he then passed over nine years at Ticonderoga.

He came here in January, 1878.

He is a native of Queensbury, and was born in this town on the 21st day of October, 1838.

Dr. G.W. Little received his degree in 1858, after completing the requisite course at the Albany Medical College.

During this year he was assistant house-surgeon of the Albany City Hospital.

He came here for one year.

In 1859 he went to Johnsburgh, in this county, where he remained until 1865.

In that year he removed to Fort Edward, in which place he practiced until the spring of 1881.

While there he was in partnership with Dr. B.F. Cornell, of Moreau, for the ten years ending in 1877, and served three successive terms as coroner.

Soon after his arrival in Glens Falls he entered into copartnership with H.W. Coffin, which lasted until July, 1884.

Since January, 1885, Dr. Hamilton Holliday has been with him.

TO BE CONTINUED ...
thelivyjr
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Re: THE POT BELLY STOVE ROOM

Post by thelivyjr »

HISTORY OF WARREN COUNTY WITH ILLUSTRATIONS AND BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF SOME OF ITS PROMINENT MEN AND PIONEERS, continued ...

EDITED BY H. P. SMITH

1885

CHAPTER XXV. HISTORY OF THE PATENT AND TOWN OF QUEENSBURY., continued ...

MUNICIPAL HISTORY., continued ...

Present Physicians, concluded ...

Dr. Fred B. Streeter is a graduate of Union College, from which he received a degree in 1876, and of the Albany Medical College, which gave him its diploma in 1879.

He immediately began to practice here.

Dr. H.W. Coffin was graduated at the New York Homoeopathic Medical College in 1880.

He practiced in New York until 1882, and then came here.

As before stated, he was in company with Dr. Little two years, but since July, 1884, has been alone.

Dr. Godfrey R. Martine was graduated from the medical department of the University of Vermont in 1862, and practiced until 1882 in Johnsburgh, Vt.

He came here in 1882, and in the following year associated with himself Dr. C.A. Foster.

Dr. C.S. Barney began to practice in Glens Falls immediately after receiving his degree from the medical department of the Union University at Albany in 1883.

Dr. C.A. Foster finished his course in the Louisville Medical College, of Louisville, Ky., in 1879.

He was then house-surgeon for the Louisville City Hospital for one year.

In 1880 he removed to Lowville, N. Y., the place of his father's residence, where he remained for three years.

In 1883 he came to Glens Falls, and entered into partnership with Dr. Martine, which has continued to the present.

Dr. G.W. Nyce dates his graduation from the medical department of the University of Philadelphia in the year 1857.

He first practiced in Michigan; second in Chicago, where he was burned out by the great fire; third in Indiana; then in Kansas.

From there he went to Greenwich, Washington county, N.Y., and thence in 1883, to Glens Falls.

Though he is a general practitioner, his specialty is in removing cancers, tumors, etc.

Dr. W. Garfield was graduated at the University of Vermont, at Burlington, in 1874.

Until September, 1883, he practiced at Pawlet, Vt., and then removed hither.

Dr. D.J. Fitzgerald received his degree from the medical department of Union University in March, 1884, and after three or four months' practice in the Hospital of New York came here.

Dr. Hamilton Holliday was also admitted to practice in March, 1884, and is also a graduate of the medical department of Union University.

For about two months after his admission he remained in the office of Dr. John Swinburne, of Albany — the Swinburne Medical Dispensary.

After leaving there he practiced for a period of eight months in Gansevoort, Saratoga county.

He came to Glens Falls and entered into partnership with Dr. Little in January, 1885.

Dr. C. Cote is a graduate of the Montreal College of Physicians and Surgeons, and a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of London, England.

He came to Glens Falls in 1884.

TO BE CONTINUED ...
thelivyjr
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Re: THE POT BELLY STOVE ROOM

Post by thelivyjr »

HISTORY OF WARREN COUNTY WITH ILLUSTRATIONS AND BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF SOME OF ITS PROMINENT MEN AND PIONEERS, continued ...

EDITED BY H. P. SMITH

1885

CHAPTER XXV. HISTORY OF THE PATENT AND TOWN OF QUEENSBURY., continued ...

MUNICIPAL HISTORY., continued ...

Dental. — The first dentist in this town was George McNeil.

Another dentist who came here very early and remained until a comparatively recent date was James E. Cadwell, who is unfortunate in that he has been pronounced insane.

George E. Knox was here formerly, too, and was bought out by James S. Garrett, who came here in 1860.

Dr. Garrett still practices his profession here.

He passed his apprenticeship with Dr. Knox.

J.H. Foulds was graduated at the Ohio Dental College at Cincinnati, in 1881, and began to practice in Glens Falls immediately.

W.S. Huntington, after an experience of fourteen years in Watertown, Jefferson county, came here in November, 1882.

J.W. Benson began practice as a dentist about the year 1858 in Otsego county.

He came to Glens Falls in 1863 and has continued here in successful practice since.

TO BE CONTINUED ...
thelivyjr
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Re: THE POT BELLY STOVE ROOM

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HISTORY OF WARREN COUNTY WITH ILLUSTRATIONS AND BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF SOME OF ITS PROMINENT MEN AND PIONEERS, continued ...

EDITED BY H. P. SMITH

1885

CHAPTER XXV. HISTORY OF THE PATENT AND TOWN OF QUEENSBURY., continued ...

MUNICIPAL HISTORY., continued ...

Civil Engineer. — James W. Reed is a graduate from the department of civil engineering at Cornell University.

He received his degree in June, 1883.

He was employed by the United States government on the Mississippi commission for nearly a year, and was afterwards overseer of the work of putting in a system of sewerage at Cape May.

He came here in the spring of 1884.

TO BE CONTINUED ...
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Re: THE POT BELLY STOVE ROOM

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HISTORY OF WARREN COUNTY WITH ILLUSTRATIONS AND BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF SOME OF ITS PROMINENT MEN AND PIONEERS, continued ...

EDITED BY H. P. SMITH

1885

CHAPTER XXV. HISTORY OF THE PATENT AND TOWN OF QUEENSBURY., continued ...

MUNICIPAL HISTORY., continued ...

Present Mercantile Interests. — The village of Glens Falls has always been by far the most important mercantile center of the county, but not until the close of the war did it exhibit significant signs of growth as a manufacturing locality, excepting in the one branch of the manufacture of lumber and lumber products.

About that time, however, the manufacturing interest received an impetus which has not lost or lessened its influence down to the present day.

The early and defunct business interests have been already sufficiently detailed in the preceding pages of the town history.

There are at present no fewer than fifty-four mercantile establishments in the village —all apparently prosperous.

The oldest establishment at present conducted is the furniture store of C.M. Wilmarth, which was started in 1841 by his father and grandfather, M.L. and Leander Wilmarth.

At first it was only a miniature chair factory on Warren street, the first in the section.

J.L. Kenworthy (hardware and crockery) established himself here in about 1842 or '43, in company with Noble Peck.

The two remained together until Peck's death in 1862, since which time Mr. Kenworthy has been alone.

He has been a resident of Glens Falls since 1831.

George Ferguson is proprietor of a dry goods and Yankee notions house on Glen street.

The business was started about 1850 by his father, Henry Ferguson.

From 1856 to 1870 George Ferguson and his father conducted the business together.

In February of the latter year Henry Ferguson died, and his son, the present proprietor, assumed, and has since retained, sole control of the establishment.

The furniture store of Bullard & Loomis was initiated in i860 by H. Colvin, in Exchange Place.

Colvin was burned out in 1864, and immediately recommenced business across the street.

In 1875 he took Charles E. Bullard into partnership with him.

In 1876 Henry Swan bought Colvin's interest, and the firm was thereafter Bullard & Swan until 1879.

Then Mr. Bullard was alone until the fall of 1882, when John R. Loomis acquired an interest, which he still retains.

The Crandell Block, which they occupy, was built with reference to their business.

They occupy about 15,000 feet floor room.

They are also furnishing undertakers.

George H. Bassinger opened a jewelry store on Glen street, nearly across from his present store, in 1860.

He was burned out in 1864, and immediately re-opened, farther south.

He came into his present place in 1872.

De Long & Sons began the hardware business here in 1861.

They were also burned out in the great fire of 1864, after which they came to their present quarters.

The members of the firm respectively are Z.I. De Long, T.S. De Long and J.B. De Long.

M. Snyder, manufacturing confectioner, started here in 1862, at 68 Glen street; moved to his present store, 22 Warren street, in 1879.

TO BE CONTINUED ...
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