THE POT BELLY STOVE ROOM

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thelivyjr
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Re: THE POT BELLY STOVE ROOM

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HISTORY OF WARREN COUNTY WITH ILLUSTRATIONS AND BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF SOME OF ITS PROMINENT MEN AND PIONEERS, continued ...

EDITED BY H. P. SMITH

1885

CHAPTER XXV. HISTORY OF THE PATENT AND TOWN OF QUEENSBURY., continued ...

MUNICIPAL HISTORY., continued ...

Present Manufacturing Interests. — As observed in another page, the manufacturing interests of this place have grown to their present respectable proportions mainly since the late war.

Something of an impetus was given to the lumber trade, it is true, when the feeder was first made a navigable channel in 1832, but this was confined to one branch of industry, and had little or no effect in starting up the other interests which now exist here.

Glens Falls has, however, become not only a village of considerable present importance as a manufacturing center, but promises more richly of the future than its past ever indicated would be possible.

The difficulties and obstacles to its attaining importance in this respect are transitory, its resources are various and well nigh inexhaustible, and its water power tremendous.

Being the gateway of the Lake George region, it receives considerable wealth from the open-handed visitors of summer who stop here a day or a night on their way to the waters which the fancy of J. Fenimore Cooper has immortalized.

Before the opening of the railroads, the transportation of the products of the various manufactories was greatly facilitated by the Glens Falls Transportation Company, which was incorporated soon after the opening of the feeder.

The president for the first six years of its existence was John Keenan, who organized, and, it has been said, almost constituted the company.

The capital stock at first was $50,000.

The object of the formation of the company was the more convenient and expeditious shipment of products to New York.

The company owned at first twenty-five canal boats, and did an extensive business.

In those days there was a large tanning interest in the county, and the company was largely employed in the transportation of hides and leather.

The business naturally suffered something of a decline after the completion of the railroads.

Upon John Keenan's retirement from the presidency he was succeeded by S. L. Goodman, and the latter by Thomas Coolidge.

The present president is Samuel Pruyn.

TO BE CONTINUED ...
thelivyjr
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Re: THE POT BELLY STOVE ROOM

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HISTORY OF WARREN COUNTY WITH ILLUSTRATIONS AND BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF SOME OF ITS PROMINENT MEN AND PIONEERS, continued ...

EDITED BY H. P. SMITH

1885

CHAPTER XXV. HISTORY OF THE PATENT AND TOWN OF QUEENSBURY., continued ...

MUNICIPAL HISTORY., continued ...

The Lumber Industry. — The reader has already been given, in Chapter XVI, a general description of this business as developed in the county at large.

By far the greater part of it centers at Glens Falls and vicinity.

Many of the citizens of this town have devoted their energies to the up-building of the industry and have secured ample fortunes.

Companies have been organized embracing in their composition men of character, influence and force, and enormous mills have been built with all the accessories for carrying on the work on a large scale.

The firm to which succeeded the Morgan Lumber Company was organized in the fall of 1865, and was then composed of James Morgan, A. M. Adsit, William McEchron and Jonas Ordway, under the firm name of Morgan, Adsit & Company.

They purchased what were then known as the Cheney mills, comprising all of the milling property on the south side of the river at Glens Falls, including a vast amount of real estate along the river, the limestone and marble quarries of that property and the dock property on the canal.

Previous to 1865 Messrs. Morgan and McEchron had been doing business for several years, but owned no mill property, hiring their sawing done at the Cheney mills; still earlier Mr. Morgan was engaged in lumber operations alone.

Mr. Adsit died in the spring of 1871, and in the succeeding fall J. Underwood bought his interest and the firm name changed to James Morgan & Co.

Mr. Morgan died August 1st, 1873, and in the following January his interest was sold to what was then the Albany house, who had sold the lumber of the firm (W. H. Weaver & Co.) and William F. Spier, and the style was changed to the Morgan Lumber Company; thus it has remained.

Mr. Underwood's interest was bought by the remaining partners on the first of January, 1880.

Extensive improvements were inaugurated from the beginning of the first named firm and continued to recent times; the mills were enlarged and improved until they were practically rebuilt, and are now among the largest in the county, and for years the company have done the largest business.

About two hundred and fifty hands are employed, in the manufacture of lumber and lime, the same company owning and operating a marble mill.

Their operations include the manufacture of staves, wood for burning lime, and other minor products.

Their lumber is sold largely in New York.

The original cost of the mill property was $200,000.

The present members of the company are William McEchron, Jonas Ordway and William E. Spier, of Glens Falls, and W. H. Weaver & Co., of Albany.

TO BE CONTINUED ...
thelivyjr
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Re: THE POT BELLY STOVE ROOM

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HISTORY OF WARREN COUNTY WITH ILLUSTRATIONS AND BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF SOME OF ITS PROMINENT MEN AND PIONEERS, continued ...

EDITED BY H. P. SMITH

1885

CHAPTER XXV. HISTORY OF THE PATENT AND TOWN OF QUEENSBURY., continued ...

MUNICIPAL HISTORY., continued ...

The Lime Business. — The manufacture of lime has for many years been only second in this town to the lumber industry.

The quantity now manufactured at Glens Falls is equaled in no other place in the country except Rockland, Me., while in point of quality it stands at the head.

The rock in the quarries here yields when properly calcined from ninety-five to ninety-eight per cent, of the purest and whitest lime to be found on the continent.

The lime-producing rock is embraced in an area of about one hundred and fifty acres, beginning at the head of the falls and extending in a narrow belt eastward on both sides of the river for about half a mile, the strata dipping slightly towards the south and disappearing.

Above, below and on the north it breaks suddenly off, giving place to a rock of entirely different character.

Lime was first burned here as early as 1820 by Pownell Shaw simply for home consumption.

It was first manufactured for shipment (to Troy) by Keyes P. Cool, in 1832.

The business was continued by K. P. Cool and Sons (J. B., Hiram M. and Alvin) until about 1861, when the Jointa Lime Company, organized in about 1858, purchased all their property, including their canal boats known as Cool's six day line.

The Jointa Lime Company was first composed of John Keenan and Halsey R. Wing; but at this time Leonard G. McDonald was admitted partner and new purchases of lime rock were made.

The business was continued without change of ownership until 1871 when the Keenan and Wing interest (i.e., the 2/3 part of all real and personal property including bills receivable and book accounts) was sold for the sum of two hundred thousand dollars to Leonard G. McDonald, Walter McDonald, Joseph Fowler, and S. L. Goodman, and thus it continued until the spring of 1876, when Leonard G. and Walter sold out and a new firm was organized composed of Joseph Fowler, S. L. Goodman, Charles Fowler and T. S. Coolidge.

Since then there has been no change.

The Morgan Lime Company was formed in 1868 and composed of James Morgan & Company, Harmon R. Leavens and Thomas S. Coolidge.

They built two kilns that season and two the next, and thus they ran till 1876 when the two-thirds owned by Leavens and Coolidge was purchased by the then Morgan Lumber Company, and later they built a fifth kiln and have so run till this time.

Since May 1st, 1884, they have been permitted to furnish six-thirtieths of the lime.

TO BE CONTINUED ...
thelivyjr
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Re: THE POT BELLY STOVE ROOM

Post by thelivyjr »

HISTORY OF WARREN COUNTY WITH ILLUSTRATIONS AND BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF SOME OF ITS PROMINENT MEN AND PIONEERS, continued ...

EDITED BY H. P. SMITH

1885

CHAPTER XXV. HISTORY OF THE PATENT AND TOWN OF QUEENSBURY., continued ...

MUNICIPAL HISTORY., continued ...

The Lime Business.

The Sherman Lime Company was formed about the year 1862 and was composed of Augutus Sherman, D. W. Sherman and H. G. Lapham.

Augustus Sherman died in the fall of 1884, but his interest remains in the estate; otherwise there has been no change in the company.

The Glens Falls Lime Company was formed about the year 1863 and composed of K. P. Cool and Hiram Wilcox.

In 1865 James C. Clark was admitted to an interest in the company.

He died in 1866 or 1867 and his interest was sold to F. W. Robinson.

The firm continued thus until 1880 when the business was purchased by the Glens Falls and the Jointa Lime companies and the Glens Falls Lime Company was discontinued.

The Glens Falls Company was formed about 1866, or 1867, and was first composed of J. W. Finch, Samuel Pruyn and the Jointa Lime Company.

Soon afterward the interest of the Jointa Company was sold to the other members and D. W. Finch was admitted; thus the firm remains.

In 1881 the Lime Companies of Glens Falls purchased the lime works of R. W. Lowber, at Ball Mountain, Washington county, and still own them jointly.

On the 6th day of April, 1871, the contract then existing under which the Jointa Lime Company, Sherman Lime Company and Glens Falls Lime Company were governed in the sales of lime was abrogated and a new and similar contract was made for ten years from that date, in which all the companies then making lime here were made parties and shared in the lime that should be manufactured and sold in proportion as they owned kilns, as follows to-wit, Jointa Lime Company, ten parts; Sherman Lime Company, six parts; Glens Falls Lime Company, four parts; Morgan Lime Company, four parts; and thus was it continued not only the ten years but by mutual consent it has been recognized as binding during the four years since its expiration.

In the spring of 1876 the Jointa Lime Company sold to the Glens Falls Company three kilns, and in the winter of 1880 the Glens Falls Lime Company's kilns and property were purchased by the Glens Falls and Jointa Lime Company, thus leaving but four companies in the combination.

In 1884 two kilns were added to the total of twenty-eight and the addition conceded to the proportion of the Morgan Lime Company, and from May 1st, 1884, the proportions have been upon the following basis: Glens Falls Company, ten parts; Jointa Lime Company, eight parts; Sherman Lime Company, six parts; Morgan Lime Company, six parts.

TO BE CONTINUED ...
thelivyjr
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Re: THE POT BELLY STOVE ROOM

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HISTORY OF WARREN COUNTY WITH ILLUSTRATIONS AND BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF SOME OF ITS PROMINENT MEN AND PIONEERS, continued ...

EDITED BY H. P. SMITH

1885

CHAPTER XXV. HISTORY OF THE PATENT AND TOWN OF QUEENSBURY., continued ...

MUNICIPAL HISTORY., continued ...

The Lime Business, concluded ...

In this connection the following letter written to a correspondent by Dr. A. W. Holden, in 1884, will be found of interest and value, even at the risk of some slight repetition:

"Geologically speaking the Glens Falls marbles, of which there are two strata, the upper or gray, which is highly fossiliferous, and averages from about two to four feet in thickness, and the lower or black which ranges about eleven feet in thickness — belong to the Trenton limestone group, and in some places (at Sandy Hill and the Big Dam) are overlaid by the Utica shales, but not here at Glens Falls."

"There are two marble saw-mills, one on either side of the river, their product forming a very considerable item of our industries and exports, in the shape of huge sawed and squared blocks, for canal locks, foundation walls, etc., sawed slabs polished for ornamental inside work for dwellings and public buildings, such as bases, fire jambs, mantel-pieces, etc., also largely for flooring and tiles."

"Another product of the various quarries, where about one hundred men are employed, is cut stone for various architectural purposes, such as capitals, friezes, pilasters, plinths, coping, horse-blocks, door-steps, window-sills and caps, etc., the entire product varying according to commercial demand, from $100,000 to $300,000 per annum."

"In regard to the lime industry here, we have on both sides of the river thirty kilns, divided between four companies, which for purposes of sale are consolidated much after the manner of a stock company, of which each is expected to produce and place in the hands of their joint factors to sell or put on the market in thirtieths according to the following ratio, the numerators representing the number of kilns owned by each: Glens Falls Company, ten-thirtieths; Jointa Lime Company, eight-thirtieths; Sherman Lime Company, six-thirtieths; Morgan Lime Company, six-thirtieths."

"The kilns are all of the kind formerly called 'patent,' but the patent having expired, they are now called 'perpetual,' because the fires, so long as the kilns are operated, are kept going night and day; they are fed from the top daily (or oftener) and drawn from the bottom as often."

"The capacity of the kilns varies from two hundred and fifty to three hundred barrels each."

"The bulk is not materially changed by burning."

"According to fuel and conditions of temperature, it takes from sixty to seventy-two hours to burn the entire contents of a kiln."

"Under the old method by which the contents of a kiln were first burned, then the fires extinguished and the contents drawn, it took from six to ten days."

"The average daily product of each kiln is one hundred barrels, and the total consolidated product 600,000 barrels per annum."

This amount fairly represents the annual proceeds of this industry for the last twenty-five years.

Of this for the last few years, over one-half, or about 300,000 barrels, are shipped by rail, something like 100,000 barrels being shipped by cars in bulk; the remainder being exported by canal.

Of this over one-third goes to the New England States, one-third to New York State at large and the west, and the remainder to New York city; the balance to the Middle States and south.

The number of hands employed is roughly estimated at from four hundred to five hundred, varying largely with the season of the year and demand.

About one thousand barrels per year would cover the home demand and sales.

About thirty thousand cords of wood (the fuel used) are annually consumed in this manufacture.

This is principally the waste product of our lumber saw-mills, really little cord wood being used and that of an inferior sort.

The barrels and casks, with the exception of putting on the hoops, are all made by machinery, the staves and heading being also furnished from what would be waste material from the saw-mills, the estimated cost being about twenty cents each.

Until about twenty-five years ago this industry continued gradually to increase in value and importance from its first inception about seventy years ago.

TO BE CONTINUED ...
thelivyjr
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Re: THE POT BELLY STOVE ROOM

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HISTORY OF WARREN COUNTY WITH ILLUSTRATIONS AND BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF SOME OF ITS PROMINENT MEN AND PIONEERS, continued ...

EDITED BY H. P. SMITH

1885

CHAPTER XXV. HISTORY OF THE PATENT AND TOWN OF QUEENSBURY., continued ...

MUNICIPAL HISTORY., continued ...

The oldest manufacturing business now in Glens Falls is the foundry and machine shop of J. L. & S. B. Dix.

The business was established about the year 1844 by James Wells.

In 1848 Hopkins & Dix bought out Wells, and continued the business until 1854, when Henry M. Lewis came into the firm.

In about a year, however, another change altered the firm name to Hopkins, Dix & Clendon.

In 1856 Hopkins withdrew; in 1869 Hopkins succeeded Clendon; in 1874 S. B. Dix, son to J. L. Dix, succeeded Knox.

J. L. Dix came here about 1820 with his father, Samuel Dix, a lumberman, who died in 1857.

The Glens Falls Paper Company was incorporated as a stock company with a capital stock of $24,000 in 1864.

The president was Mark A. Cushing; the stockholders were E. H. Rosekrans, Albert N. Cheney, Ransom M. Hawkins, John P. Sherwood, Mark A. Cushing, and A. T. Harris, the last named being the treasurer.

They built their first mill of wood, but it was destroyed in July, 1883, by a fire caused by the explosion of a boiler, whereupon the present mill was constructed of brick.

Just before the fire the company was re-organized and purchased the water-rights of the Morgan Lumber Company, which became stockholders in the paper company.

The new mill cost $185,000.

The sole product of the factory is the material on which newspapers are printed.

Sixty or seventy men are employed.

The mill has a capacity for making ten tons of paper daily.

The pulp is made at Palmer's Falls and at Ticonderoga.

The president is W. E. Spier.

The Glen Shirt Company was formed in 1879, by Joseph Fowler and D. L. Robertson.

The present factory, which is operated by steam, was built in 1881-82.

The annual products are about $250,000 in value.

About three hundred hands are employed in the shop, while work is sent out to no fewer than five hundred more.

A shirt factory which has become one of the prominent manufactories of the place, was started in May, 1876, by W. E. Spier, and was known as the Glens Falls Collar Company.

Two years later James L. Libby became connected with the business and the firm name changed to Libby & Spier; this style was changed January 1st, 1883, to James L. Libby & Co., the present style, the firm being composed of James L. Libby, Charles A. Libby, Charles A. Gilbert and Theo. Franklin.

About six hundred hands are employed in their extensive building on Park street, while about 1800 people are carried on their pay roll.

The capacity of the factory is about two hundred shirts and six hundred dozen collars and cuffs daily.

Charles A. Gilbert is the manager.

TO BE CONTINUED ...
thelivyjr
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Re: THE POT BELLY STOVE ROOM

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HISTORY OF WARREN COUNTY WITH ILLUSTRATIONS AND BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF SOME OF ITS PROMINENT MEN AND PIONEERS, continued ...

EDITED BY H. P. SMITH

1885

CHAPTER XXV. HISTORY OF THE PATENT AND TOWN OF QUEENSBURY., continued ...

MUNICIPAL HISTORY., continued ...

The Clark Colored Brick and Terra Cotta Company, a stock company, was formed in the fall of 1879.

It received its name from T. M. Clark, the founder.

The products of the company's industry were pressed brick and terra cotta and fancy tiles.

The enterprise was unsuccessful and went into the hands of a receiver, but was re-organized in the spring of 1884 under the name of the Glens Falls Terra Cotta and Brick Company, with a capital of $45,000.

Since the re- organization J. M. Coolidge has been and is now the president of the company, and Charles Scales, secretary and superintendent.

They manufacture now red and buff brick and tiles.

The Glens Falls Company, a partnership composed of J. W. Finch, D. J. Finch and Samuel Pruyn, manufacture lumber, lime and marble.

This is a large and powerful organization, but we have been unable to obtain details of their operations.

The Glens Falls Hub and Spoke Company, under the management and proprietorship of S. Williamson and his son, J. M. Williamson, was purchased by them in 1883 of the Jointa Lime Company and E. R. Bain.

The Jointa Lime Company had had a controlling interest in the business since its beginning, but had always been associated with some partner.

E. R. Bain's interest was begun about six years before he parted with it.

The capacity of the mill, which is contained in seven different buildings, is represented as follows: About twenty-five sets of hubs, seven hundred spokes, fifteen thousand staves and ten thousand curry-comb handles daily.

D. C. Holman and D. W. Sherman, own and conduct a brick-yard and tile-works near the village.

H. R. T. Coffin has also, in two separate yards, a brick yard and a tile yard.

The soil in the vicinity of Glens Falls consists of limestone strata for a depth of twelve feet, and below that an excellent limestone is obtained which is valuable for building purposes.

Up to 1884 large quantities were shipped to Albany.

Goodman & Coolidge are and for years have been largely interested in the quarries here.

James Palmeter had a carriage-factory many years ago on the site of the Catholic church, and was there for many years.

Joubert & White (Edward Joubert and James H. White) began the manufacture of light carriages at their present, location as early as 1i860.

Lightwork is a specialty.

They are the inventors and patentees of the celebrated Joubert & White Buckboard, which is shipped all over the country.

The firm employs about thirty hands.

TO BE CONTINUED ...
thelivyjr
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Re: THE POT BELLY STOVE ROOM

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HISTORY OF WARREN COUNTY WITH ILLUSTRATIONS AND BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF SOME OF ITS PROMINENT MEN AND PIONEERS, continued ...

EDITED BY H. P. SMITH

1885

CHAPTER XXV. HISTORY OF THE PATENT AND TOWN OF QUEENSBURY., continued ...

MUNICIPAL HISTORY., continued ...

For five years after 1874 Nelson La Salle, in company with three others, manufactured all kinds of wagons and carriages in Glens Falls, under the name of the Union Carriage Works.

In 1879 La Salle joined George Ferriss about two years in the same business, after which he came to the present site in company with E. J. Dickinson.

In 1881 Dickinson withdrew, and La Salle now conducts the business alone.

Twelve hands are employed.

William B. Griffin and Freeman E. Wood, under the firm name of Griffin & Wood, began to make carriages in 1882, in the old shop of the Morris Brothers.

They do light and heavy work.

P. W., E., M. J., J. T., and R. T. Cashion, under the name of Cashion Brothers, commenced light and heavy work in carriages in 1883.

They employ eleven hands.

TO BE CONTINUED ...
thelivyjr
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Re: THE POT BELLY STOVE ROOM

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HISTORY OF WARREN COUNTY WITH ILLUSTRATIONS AND BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF SOME OF ITS PROMINENT MEN AND PIONEERS, continued ...

EDITED BY H. P. SMITH

1885

CHAPTER XXV. HISTORY OF THE PATENT AND TOWN OF QUEENSBURY., continued ...

MUNICIPAL HISTORY., continued ...

Glens Falls Academy 51 — This academy owes its origin to the enlightened public spirit of the citizens of this village, who, desiring to afford their youth the opportunities for training furnished by the best English and classical academies, took measures to found such an institution, and at a meeting of citizens held on the 24th day of February, 1841, the following named gentlemen were elected members of its first board of trustees: William Caldwell, Halsey Rogers, John J. Harris, Hiram Barber, John R. Thurman, Walter Geer, jr., Alonzo W. Morgan, Russell M. Little, Elmore Platt, Billy J. Clark, Jonathan W. Freeman, George Sanford, Bethuel Peck, Julius H. Rice, Henry Ferguson, Enoch H. Rosekrans, Alfred Fisher and George G. Hawley; the officers of the board being: president, Billy J. Clark; secretary, Enoch H. Rosekrans; treasurer, George Sanford; collector, Russell M. Little.

The board of trustees decided to erect at once a suitable building for the accommodation of the proposed school, and the following trustees were appointed a building committee: Alonzo W. Morgan, Walter Geer, jr., and Jonathan W. Freeman.

The present academy site was secured and the academy building was erected during the spring and summer of 1841.

This building, with a large addition made in 1870, comprises the structure at present in use.

Presidents. — During the forty-four years of its existence the academy has had but three presidents, as follows: Billy J. Clark, 1841-51; Bethuel Peck, M.D., 1851-63; Rev. A. J. Fennel, D.D., 1863 to present.

Trustees. — The institution has been fortunate in the men who have been its guardians, many of the best citizens of this and adjoining towns serving at different times as members of the board.

In addition to the gentlemen constituting the original and present boards, the following have served the institution as members of the board of trustees at different times: Jonathan W. Fairbanks, Jonathan Burr, Albert N. Cheney, Daniel H. Cowles, Sheldon Benedict, Henry Ferguson, Dwight Hitchcock, N. E. Sheldon, M.D., Lewis Hunt, Zabina Ellis, J. R. Thurman, Ezra Benedict, William A. Fonda, Halsey R. Wing, Alexander Robertson, Rev. A. J. Fennel, Stephen L. Goodman, Daniel V. Brown, Isaac Mott, Jerome Lapham, George Rugge, Martin Coffin, Stephen Brown, Z. I. De Long, William McEchron, Wallace W. Rockwell, Austin W. Holden, M.D., Henry J. Lapham, Frederick A. Johnson, Jarvis A. Underwood.

The board at present (1885) is constituted as follows: Rev. A. J. Fennel, D.D., Hon. Jerome Lapham, Jeremiah W. Finch, H. S. Crittenden, Hon. F. A. Johnson, Rev. Fenwick Cookson, Melville A. Sheldon, William McEchron, A. W. Holden, M.D., John L. Cunningham, William A. Wait, and Daniel C. Farr.

51 Contributed by Prof. D. C. Farr.

TO BE CONTINUED ...
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Re: THE POT BELLY STOVE ROOM

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HISTORY OF WARREN COUNTY WITH ILLUSTRATIONS AND BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF SOME OF ITS PROMINENT MEN AND PIONEERS, continued ...

EDITED BY H. P. SMITH

1885

CHAPTER XXV. HISTORY OF THE PATENT AND TOWN OF QUEENSBURY., continued ...

MUNICIPAL HISTORY., continued ...

Glens Falls Academy, continued ...

Instructors. —The trustees have always endeavored to secure as teachers only such as were liberally educated and were in thorough sympathy with the object of the academy in holding up a high standard of scholarship and culture as the end to be reached by its students.

Most of its principals have been college graduates and a number of them have been eminent as educators.

The following is the list of principals who have served the institution since its foundation: Thomas S. Farnsworth, Elbridge Hosmer, L. R. Satterlee, George Rugge, William McLaren, sr., Rev. Jason F. Walker, Edson Fobes, Warren P. Adams, Rev. John Babcock, James A. Russell, Alson B. Abbott, Charles W. Hall, William A. Holman, James S. Cooley; and associate principals, William McLaren, jr., and Frances A. Tefft.

In this connection should be named the very able preceptress, Miss Dora Wilson, who served the academy with great acceptance during the entire period covered by the principalship of the following: Messrs. Russell, Abbott, Hall, Holman and a portion of Mr. Cooley.

Students. — The value of any educational institution is shown by the character of its students as exhibited in after life; judged by this standard Glens Falls Academy can truly be considered a successful institution, since it can number upon its roll of students such names as Algernon Paddock, late United States Senator from Nebraska, together with his brother, Frank Paddock, esq., an eminent lawyer of New York city; Hon. Frederick Johnson, Member of Congress from New York; the late Rev. Edgar Goodspeed, D.D., of Chicago, pastor at the time of his death of the largest Baptist Church in America, and his brother and successor, Rev. Thomas Goodspeed; Hon. Daniel E. Sickles, former Member of Congress and major-general in United States army; Lemon Thompson, a prominent business man of Albany, a graduate and trustee of Union College; John Bentley, esq., a leading lawyer of Denver, Col., and former United States commissioner of pensions; Charles Hendley, who has been one of the secretaries of the last five presidents; Rev. Sheldon Jackson, D.D., for many years district secretary for the Presbyterian Church of the Rocky Mountain District, and at present in charge of an educational institution at Sitka, Alaska Territory, where he holds an important position under the government; Herbert S. Underwood, one of the editors of the Springfield Republican, and a large number of others, who either in professional or business life have secured an enviable reputation.

TO BE CONTINUED ...
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