HISTORY OF THE MOHAWK VALLEY

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Re: HISTORY OF THE MOHAWK VALLEY

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History of the Mohawk Valley: Gateway to the West 1614-1925

Chapter 67: 1779. Clinton's Overland Portage March from the Mohawk to Otsego Lake, by John Fea, Amsterdam., continued ...

The Otsquago Trail, designated as A on the map, utilized by the right wing of the Clinton division, was an interesting road in all its details.

After leaving the river at Sand Hill near Fort Plain this road paralleled the Otsquago Creek inland about three miles in a westerly direction, then veered sharply southwest into the present highway at Hallsville corners.

At the Loie Kill Brook the trail went over the hill through the Schnach and Wieting farms and passed at the rear of the present Levi Grey buildings, then took a direct line to the present village of Starkville, the main street of which forms its site.

From Camp Creek, near Starkville, it went due west up the Steep Hill to the present Benjamin Ward farm house two miles from Starkville.

Here it divided, one trail going to Otsego Lake, one up to Waiontha (Little) Lakes, the other westward to Canandarago Lake.

This last was a continuation of the ancient French trail from Canada which passed Johnson Hall at Johnstown and came through Stone Arabia to the Mohawk River.

The Montressor English map of 1775 shows these roads plainly from the Mohawk River, also the ones to Cherry Valley and Springfield.


At the time of this expedition there was no wagon road along the Otsquago where the present village of Van Hornesville stands.

The creek had its course in close against the west hillside and its bed was where the hotels known as the Orange Tunicliff and Signor Hotels now are.

The bank, on which the village school now stands, diverted the creek eastward a hundred feet and it thence took a course along where the old Van Horne Stone mill is at the present time.

As it was found necessary to go over this short stretch of ground, to make connection with the Pumpkin Hook wagon road to Springfield, a log road was made in the bed of the creek where the hotels stand, and, over this improvised road, the two heavy pieces of artillery were taken up the trail to the Pumpkin Hook wagon road and on to Springfield.

The old Otsquago Trail crossed the creek near the present residence of Byron Wiles and is now the road to Willse Corners from Van Hornesville.

It was on this trail that Matthew DeGarmore, the hunter, trapper and scout resided.

The Waiontha beaver wilderness was well known to DeGarmore, who disposed of furs to John Tingue at his log tavern, a mile below Van Hornesville.

Tingue, from his advantageous location, was on friendly terms with all who passed over the trails, being contiguous to all of those trails leading to his tavern, and he did a thriving trade with hunters and trappers and took the furs to Albany, which he bartered for rum and other things.

TO BE CONTINUED ...
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Re: HISTORY OF THE MOHAWK VALLEY

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History of the Mohawk Valley: Gateway to the West 1614-1925

Chapter 67: 1779. Clinton's Overland Portage March from the Mohawk to Otsego Lake, by John Fea, Amsterdam., continued ...

About one-half mile south of present Van Hornesville, a small settlement existed previous to 1775, in what is known as the Pumpkin Hook district.

This was near the dividing line between the source of Otsquago Creek which flows to the Mohawk Valley and of Summit Lake, the most northerly source of Otsego Lake and the Susquehanna River.

In this settlement resided three brothers, John, Sebastian and Mathias Shaul, also Frederick and John Bronner and a family by the name of Tetherly and a few others out toward Summit Lake.

An old wagon road traversed this district easterly around Summit Lake, thence south two-and-one-half miles to Springfield.

Three miles west of Springfield and two miles from Otsego Lake was the Waiontha Wilderness water-basin, which was prolific with beaver.

At the present time the two pretty lakes there are commonly known as Little Lakes, with an outlet to Otsego Lake known as Lawyers Creek.

In 1779, when water was held back by beaver dams on this outlet, the space covered three miles in length and over a mile in width within the borders of Waiontha, and at the present time this basin is the principal source of water flowing into Otsego Lake.

The occupation of Matthew DeGarmore, in hunting and trapping beaver, gave him a better knowledge of the Waiontha water-basin than any other settler near its vicinity.

He was early engaged as a scout to assist in breaking away the beaver dams when Otsego Lake had been prepared to hold the water of Waiontha at the time of Clinton's expedition.

Clinton's General Orders for the movement of troops commence on June 6th, 1779, at Albany, issued to the Third New York Regiment (Col. Peter Gansevoort's), and on the 8th, the artillery was ordered to hold itself in readiness to march at the shortest notice from Albany.

At Schenectady, June 11th, General Orders show the methodical movement of the Mohawk Valley part of the expedition, and is given herewith in full, from Capt. Leonard Bleeker's Order Book, following which is given a brief outline of the Fourth Pennsylvania Regiment, which acted as a convoy from Schenectady, taken from the Journal of Lieutenant Beatty.

The boats to transport the provisions and stores of equipage had to be at hand and ready in the river at Schenectady.

These boats were transported by land from Albany to Schenectady and loaded with the three months' stock of provision, all of which had been carted overland, and, at Schenectady, were put in charge of Henry Glen, a Division Quartermaster General, who loaded them and sent them up the Mohawk River under a proper escort.

On June 11, when General Clinton had his headquarters at. Schenectady, he ordered Lieut.-Col. Pierre Regnier of the old Fourth Line New York Regiment to proceed to Canajoharie flats and lay out the ground upon which the troops would encamp.

The Canajoharie flats had been the ancient maize land of the several Indian villages located on the highland of the Happy Hollow district in 1634.

The flats had been denuded of all shrubbery for years and were now covered with luxuriant grass, which afforded excellent pasturage for the 500 horses and cattle collected there for this expedition.

There was also a copious supply of springwater along the hillsides for the use of the troops.

TO BE CONTINUED ...
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Re: HISTORY OF THE MOHAWK VALLEY

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History of the Mohawk Valley: Gateway to the West 1614-1925

Chapter 67: 1779. Clinton's Overland Portage March from the Mohawk to Otsego Lake, by John Fea, Amsterdam., continued ...

"General Orders."

"Schenectady, June 11th, 1779."

"Tomorrow morning Colonel Gansevoort's regiment will proceed to load the batteaux now in the river, taking the direction from Mr. Henry Glenn, A.D.Q. General, with all possible dispatch."

"The commanding officer of the regiment will direct the officers to see that they are sufficiently manned."

"They will be divided in squads, each under the direction of an officer, who will see that those under his care are kept together, as he will be answerable for the cargo, until it is delivered at Canajohary."

"Commissary Pratt will proceed with the stores and provisions to Canajohary to receive it from the batteaux."

"When the detachment under Lieut.-Col. Butler (lately stationed at Schoharie) arrives in town, they will proceed to load the remainder of the boats in the same manner."

"Mr. Glen will take care that the boats now in his immediate service are loaded as soon as they arrive."

"The Qr. Mr. will spare no pains in collecting all the teams they possibly can, as a great number will be wanted."

"Those teams which may be collected in the vicinity of Schenectady or Albany will be loaded with the provisions and stores which may remain after all the boats are loaded."

Under date of June 15 Clinton notified his brother, the Governor, as follows:

"I have ordered one hundred boats to be loaded at Schenectady and transported up the river by the Third New York Regiment and the detachment under Colonel Butler, both which fleets have already sailed."

"I have ordered one hundred more boats to be in readiness immediately, as the General (Sullivan on June 2) has ordered me to embark all the troops and take no P. horses."

"I have ordered three or four hundred wagons to be collected at Canajoharie to transport the boats and stores across the carrying place to Lake Otsego the place of embarkation where I shall await further orders to proceed."

The batteaux of the army formed so important a part of the expedition that a description of them, gathered from Bouchette and Weld, will be of interest.

They were flat-bottomed boats, having a plank around them to walk on or to pole, from thirty-five to forty feet long, each extremity terminating in a point; six feet of beam in the center; usual weight four and one-half tons; worked by oars; a mast sail; capable of carrying 1,500 lbs. of cargo; dragropes for towing, and long poles for setting them through the currents and rapids.

The sides were about four feet high, and, for the convenience of the rowers, four or five benches were laid across, sometimes more, according to the length of the batteau.

Four men managed them.

On June 15, 1779, Clinton had his headquarters established at Canajoharie Creek.

The debarkation of the boats on the Mohawk for the overland portage was at Happy Hollow Creek, one-and-a-half miles west of General Headquarters, and at the beginning of the portage road.

TO BE CONTINUED ...
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Re: HISTORY OF THE MOHAWK VALLEY

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History of the Mohawk Valley: Gateway to the West 1614-1925

Chapter 67: 1779. Clinton's Overland Portage March from the Mohawk to Otsego Lake, by John Fea, Amsterdam., continued ...

On the morning of June 11, the Fourth Pennsylvania Regiment and a detachment of Morgan's Rifle Corps, that had been stationed with them, marched from Schoharie, leaving 15 men there from each corps with proper officers for the safety of the place, and arrived at Schenectady at sundown, where they encamped.

On Sunday the 13th, according to Lieutenant Beatty's diary, they crossed over the river opposite Schenectady and were put in charge of 36 batteaus to go up the Mohawk River with a quantity of provisions.

"Monday 14 — Embarked in the boats at 2 o'clock, proceeded up the river very strong water went 3 miles encamped on the shore."

"Tuesday 15 — Embarked this morning 8 o'clock proceeded on 10 miles middling strong water, encamped on shore."

This distance probably brought them up opposite to where the present Adirondack Power and Light Corporation steam plant now stands opposite Cranesville.

"Wednesday 16th — Embarked at sunrise went on 13 miles to Major Fundas where we encamped."

[This was on or near the present Fonda Fair Grounds.]

"Thursday 17th — Embarked sunrise went up very good water all day, arrived at Canajoharie at sundown 17 miles where we found Colonel Gansevoort's Regiment encamped, we immediately unloaded our boats and encamped on the left of Colonel Gansevoort's Regiment."

Gansevoort was encamped on the flats near the Henry Failing residence.

The distance from Fonda should read 13 1-2 miles.

The artillery detachment was from Col. John Lamb's Regiment.

Isaiah Wool was its captain, Thomas Machin captain, lieutenant in the Second Battalion and Elisha Harvey, lieutenant.

The ordnance consisted of a total of seven brass pieces; two six pounders; four three pounders and a small bronze mortar termed a "Coehorn."

This ordnance was hauled overland from Albany to Schenectady, then transported by boats up the Mohawk River to Canajoharie, where the small pieces were unloaded on the flats, and from there, together with the military stores, hauled over the portage road to Otsego Lake, after the boats had arrived safely at Hyde Bay.

After Clinton had arrived at Canajoharie on June 17, Major Whiting was ordered to proceed with that part of his regiment (the Sixth Massachusetts) which was stationed at Cherry Valley, to Springfield Landing (Hyde Bay) on the north end of Otsego Lake.

"He will apply to the Qr. Mr. Genl. for wagons to transport his Troops and Baggage."

"When the Troops arrive at the landing, he will throw up such Intrenchments as he may deem necessary, to prevent a surprise."

"He will exert himself in repairing the roads from the Lake downward."

"The Quarter Master General on Application, will provide him with Implements for that purpose."

"As soon as Capt. Dow arrives he will proceed to join his Regiment by the Springfield Road, which he will repair as he goes on."

"Major Whiting will dispatch a Party of Men to the outlet of the Lake, and erect a Dam, he leave a Subaltern's Guard at the Fort [Alden, Cherry Valley], to take care of the Stores and Sick till further Orders."

"When the Wagons arrive and are ready to proceed, Lieut. Col. Willet, who has offered his Services, will apply to Lieut. Col. Regnier for such a Number of Men as he thinks proper, who will issue a Detail for that purpose."

Major Whiting and Adjutant White went from Cherry Valley and returned from Headquarters of Clinton with the orders for the Regiment to march from Fort Alden, for Lake Otsego, (June 18).

TO BE CONTINUED ...
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Re: HISTORY OF THE MOHAWK VALLEY

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History of the Mohawk Valley: Gateway to the West 1614-1925

Chapter 67: 1779. Clinton's Overland Portage March from the Mohawk to Otsego Lake, by John Fea, Amsterdam., continued ...

Lieutenant McKendry in his journal of the 6th Massachusetts Regiment states: "Ditto 18th."

"The Regiment marched from Fort Alden [in Cherry Valley] 11 o'clock A. M. encampt, this night in Springfield 6 miles from the Fort, Major Whiting ordered a fatiguing party on to mend the Roads toward the Lake, it was commanded by Capt. Ballards."

McKendry journal records of the 6th Massachusetts is now given with their doings.

"June 19th, The Regt. marched from Springfield with 8 waggons carrying the bagge."

"12 o'clock A.M."

"Arrived at Lake Otsego."

"3 o'clock P. M.: Capt. Lane had gone forward to clear the encampment."

"Encampt on the heights [Mt. Wellington], 5 miles march this day."

In the General Orders issued at Camp Canajoharie Creek, June 17: "On the arrival of Lieut. Col. Wizenfelts Regiment, he will apply to the Quarter Master Genl. for Tools, and immediately proceed to repair the Roads from this Place along the Cherry Valley Road till he comes to the Springfield Road, where he will take Post, until further Orders he will be careful to keep out Guards and Scouts as are necessary for his own security, as to afford every Assistance in his Power to the Waggons as they proceed."

The journal of Lieut. Rudolphus Van Hovenburgh of Col. Wiessenfel's 4th New York Regiment commences "Stone Rapie [Arabia] June 16," and reads: "Received orders for to March on the 17 and March about six in the morning, the Troops crost the Mohawk River at Walcoats [Walrath's] ferry and our Baggage crost at Major Freys and our party joined the Regiment at Cannijohary flatts and Marcht about fife miles on the Cherry Valley Road and Incamped there that night."

This encampment was near the old Frederick Young home, one-and-a-half miles east of the present village of Buel, and at the junction of the Turlach road which goes to present Marshville, on land now owned by Attorney Newton J. Herrick.

This determines Weissenfel's command and the march of the left wing on the new Cherry Valley Road.

On this same day, June 17, the Fourth Pennsylvania Regiment under Lieut.-Col. William Butler arrived from Schenectady and camped on the Canajoharie Flats, west of General Clinton's Headquarters and between the General's Camp and Col. Peter Gansevoort, who had his Marquee near the Happy Hollow Creek, at which point the boats were hauled out of the Mohawk River.

Lieutenant-Colonel Willett and Lieutenant-Colonel Regnier had charge of debarking the boats under guard of the detachment of Lieutenant-Colonel Butler's troops, who were detailed to escort them safely to the Springfield post, the destination of their escort, at which point, Colonel Butler had his headquarters at Middle Springfield Village on June 19 and the general supervision of the movement of loaded wagons and their escort to the lake, to Major Whiting's post at Hyde Bay.

TO BE CONTINUED ...
thelivyjr
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Re: HISTORY OF THE MOHAWK VALLEY

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History of the Mohawk Valley: Gateway to the West 1614-1925

Chapter 67: 1779. Clinton's Overland Portage March from the Mohawk to Otsego Lake, by John Fea, Amsterdam., continued ...

On June 17, Colonel John Harper's Company of volunteers were posted on the Dutchdorf Kings Highway, leading to Indian Castle (from present Fort Plain now known as the Dutchtown Road) and a stand of artillery, under command of Capt. Thomas Machin, placed on Sand Hill, northwest of Fort Plain.

Machin and his Lieut. Elisha Harvey had two pieces of ordnance (6 pounders) to cover the right wing movement.

The other piece was placed at Camp Creek, at a point where the overland trail from Indian Castle branched in just beyond the present village of Starkville.

Machin on Sand Hill, between Fort Plain and Fort Plank, could cover a large range of country from that vantage point.

The other piece, taken over the Otsquago Trail a distance of eight miles, was intended to cover the Camp Creek Valley, also the Waiontha and Canadarago Trails which came in at the rear of the present Ward farm a mile and a half further west of Camp Creek.

By the evening of June 19, these three posts had been established on the right wing with the addition of another, ever since known by the name of Brown Hollow Camp, located two miles southwest of the present village of Starkville.

This camp, on June 19, was the most extreme western post from Clinton's headquarters on this date, being in a direct line distant twelve and a half miles.

The John Tingue "Tavern" was located about one-fourth mile north of the Brown Hollow Camp.

This camp was the post of Colonel Dubois pioneer bushmen in opening the road up the Otsquago Creek through present Van Hornesville to Pumpkin Hook, a distance of one mile.

This piece of road had practically to be reconstructed to enable teams with the artillery to pass through.

The Fourth Pennsylvania Regiment received orders to march over the Portage Road as follows:

"Genl. Orders."

"Camp Canajohary Creek, June 18, 1779."

"The Detachment under the command of Lieut. Col. Butler will march tomorrow Morning at Sunrise."

"The Q. M. Genl. will supply them with waggons sufficient to transport their Baggage and Stores to Springfield, they will exert themselves in forwarding on the Waggons and repairing the Roads wherever they require it."

"The Q. M. Genl. will supply them tools on Application for that Purpose."

"The Rifle Corps will be employed in scouting the Woods and keeping up the Communication between the different Posts."

"Mr. Dow the Assistant Qr. Mr. will proceed immediately to Otsego Lake with the Carpenters, and repair the Boats as they arrive, in the best Order Possible, without Loss of Time."

"Commissary Woodman will for the future supply or issue Provisions to the late Aldens Regiment and Col. Butler's when they join together; Commissary Post will issue to the New York Regiments."

"Col. Willett will issue Fatigue, Rum for all those who may be employed under him immediate Direction."

"For the Future the Assistant Q. M. Genl. or any of his Deputies will attend for Orders at Lieut. Col. Reginer's Quarters."

TO BE CONTINUED ...
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Re: HISTORY OF THE MOHAWK VALLEY

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History of the Mohawk Valley: Gateway to the West 1614-1925

Chapter 67: 1779. Clinton's Overland Portage March from the Mohawk to Otsego Lake, by John Fea, Amsterdam., continued ...

Lieutenant Beatty journal entry of departure from Canajoharie of the Fourth Pennsylvania Regiment, Col. Wm. Butler in command.

"Saturday 19th: — Struck tents very early marched on for Springfield very bad roads passed on the road a Number of Waggons with Batteaus and Provision going on to the Lake, likewise a New York Regt, which was encamped on the Road side 6 miles from Canajoharie arrived at Springfield 4 o'clock, P. M. 17 miles which had formerly been a pretty little settlement but the Indians at the destruction of Cherry Valley has likewise destroyed it."

"It lies within 4 miles of Lake Osego [Otsego?] and about 6 or 8 from Cherry Valley here we encamped in a very pleasant place."

The inhabitants of Springfield had gone early in the summer of 1778 to Fort Alden, Cherry Valley; for protection and had taken their cattle with them.

A letter to Governor Clinton dated at German Flatts July 22 states: "On Saturday the 18th, Andrew Town and Springfield was burned and destroyed by the enemy."

This was signed by Hendrick Herchimer Justice.

The movement of the overland portage of the boats and provisions was well under way on the morning of June 19.

On June 19, Van Hovenburgh of Colonel Weissenfel's regiment states in his journal (from the Sprout Brook post) "Escorted stores to Springfield the 4th Pennsyl. Regt. Marcht by us and the Rifel Core who were posted at Springfield to Escort the Stores to Lake Otsego to the Late Aulden's Regt."

The Rifle Corps mentioned by Van Hovenburgh was a detachment of Morgan's commanded by Capt. Michael Simpson.

McKendry journal of Sunday the 20th states:

"(Sunday.) Cleared the passage for the waggons to unload the stores — 60 Batteaus arrived at this lake a Quantity of provisions from the River."

The returning empty wagons were ordered to be escorted by the Alden regiment (Sixth Massachusetts), under direction of Major Whiting, to Lieut. Col. Butler's station (Middle Village Springfield.): from there they were escorted by Butler to Lieutenant Colonel Weissenfel's post (north of present Sprout Brook Village near the residence of Cornelius Flint, on land now owned by Edgar J. Dunkell, Sprout Brook).

From there they were passed over the one-half mile connection to the Left Wing Road, thence back to Canajoharie, reloaded and started on their return over the portage road.

TO BE CONTINUED ...
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Re: HISTORY OF THE MOHAWK VALLEY

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History of the Mohawk Valley: Gateway to the West 1614-1925

Chapter 67: 1779. Clinton's Overland Portage March from the Mohawk to Otsego Lake, by John Fea, Amsterdam., continued ...

Brant's Indians were skulking through the thickets watching every move.

Spies of the Tory Butler were lurking about Clinton's Camp, and every subterfuge employed by them was used to seduce soldiers to desert and thwart Clinton in his movements.

These were attended to as promptly as they could be looked after by Court Martial.

A Court Martial order of June 19 reads:

"A General Court Martial will sit Tomorrow Morning at 9 o'clock at the President's Marque for the Tryal of Mr. Henry Hare, taken on suspicions of being a Spy."

Col. Gansevoort will preside.

of the Artillery

(Captain Wool
(Captain Machin
(Capt. Lt. McClare
(Lieut. Harvey
(Lieut. Parker
(Lieut. Patterson

of the 3rd N. Y.

(Captain Anson
(Captain DeWitt
(Captain Jansen
(Captain Fiabout
(Captain Lt. Syloz
(Lieut. Conine

"Captain Porter will act as Judge Advocate."

This trial took place in the large field tent of Colonel Gansevoort near the entrance to Happy Hollow, and Hare was found guilty and sentenced to be hanged by the neck "till he is dead."

The execution took place on June 21.

At the same court martial, Daniel McKenney was tried, "for endeavouring to seduce soldiers to desert, found guilty of the charges, and sentenced to receive one hundred lashes on his bare back well laid on, and drummed out of the camp."

The execution of this was on June 21.

TO BE CONTINUED ...
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Re: HISTORY OF THE MOHAWK VALLEY

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History of the Mohawk Valley: Gateway to the West 1614-1925

Chapter 67: 1779. Clinton's Overland Portage March from the Mohawk to Otsego Lake, by John Fea, Amsterdam., continued ...

On June 21 a party of men was ordered by Colonel Butler to the foot of the lake to dam the same that the water might be raised, to carry the boats down the Susquehanna River.

Capt. Benjamin Warren of the Sixth Massachusetts Regiment commanded the party.

His diary of the Cherry Valley massacre of 1778, is printed in a previous chapter.

The several detachments of Morgan's riflemen were under command of Maj. James Parr, Capt. Michael Simpson, Lieut. Thomas Boyd and Ensign Benjamin Chambers.

Their activities consisted in patrol duty and guarding the extreme outposts of the army.

Major James Parr, in charge of Morgan's Rifles, evidently took his orders from Lieut. Col. William Butler, commander of the Fourth Pennsylvania Regiment.

No General Clinton order appears from headquarters at Canajoharie Creek governing Parr's movement.

Lieutenant Beatty journal of the Fourth Pennsylvania Regiment gives the whereabouts of Parr on Monday, June 21, as follows:

"This morning Major Parr with near 100 men properly officered went on a 3 Days Scout likewise to clear out the branch of the Susquehanna which comes out of the Lake Otsego to make it passable for Boats, likewise the two Companies of Col. Aldens Regt. (6th Mass.) moved to their Rgt. nothing else material happening a Number of waggons passing to the lake with Boats and provisions, we send out parties every day to keep the Roads in Repair."

A detachment of the Rifle Corps, under leadership of Lieut. Thomas Boyd, was scouting the Waiontha wilderness and had their rendezvous at Brown Hollow Camp, during the progress of the road work to Pumpkin Hook.

On June 22d Colonel Butler and Major Whiting went to the foot of the lake to view that post.

The orderly transport of wagons loaded with boats and provisions continued from the 19th June till the 24th, at which time Beatty states in his journal "great number of wagons passing to the lake."

McKendry of the 6th Massachusetts Regiment in his journal June 23d, states "A number of boats and provisions arrived at the Lake this day."

On the 24th he states, "Boats and Provisions arrive at this Lake very fast 500 wagons going steady."

Undoubtedly, there were at least five teams employed to each wagon containing a boat.

The roads were rough and difficult to navigate as much of the distance was up steep hills and the time consumed exceedingly short.

During three days, between June 21 and 25, squads detailed from the 3rd New York and the 5th New York were sent out at daylight with their provisions ready cooked, taking their orders from Lieutenant Colonel Willett, on the scouting support of the right wing which went over the Otsquago Trail.

TO BE CONTINUED ...
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Re: HISTORY OF THE MOHAWK VALLEY

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History of the Mohawk Valley: Gateway to the West 1614-1925

Chapter 67: 1779. Clinton's Overland Portage March from the Mohawk to Otsego Lake, by John Fea, Amsterdam., continued ...

From Lieutenant Beatty records is the following dated June 22.

"This morning the Colonel (Butler) and a number of officers besides myself went on a fishing party across Lake Otsego catching a few fish and returning in the evening on the lower end of the lake (which is about 8 miles in length and 2 in Breadth) we found two Companies of Col. Aldens Regt. (6th Massachusetts) who had made a Dam across the neck that runs out of the lake so as to Rais the water for to carry the Boats down the Creek."

This last entry in his journal gives an important clue as to the spot where the dam was made.

The neck of the lake is one-half of a mile long before it empties its water into the creek which is the beginning of the Susquehanna River.

The dam then had been completed on June 22.

Something equally important was being done over in the Waiontha wilderness.

Colonel Dubois' chosen scouts with Matthew DeGarmore, the trapper, as their pilot, were protecting the beaver dams at the outlet of the great water basin.

Lieutenant Boyd with his detachment of Morgan's riflemen had thrown a cordon around it to hold back any skulking hordes of Indians which might be expected to appear there at any moment.

On Wednesday the 23d Beatty states: "This Day about 2 o'clock Major Parr arrived with his party (Springfield Post) brought no news of any consequence but that the branch of the Susquehanna which he went down about 10 miles from Lake Otsego was passable for Boats."

"Lay in Camp all day nothing of consequence happening sending out fatigue parties on the Roads as usual likewise great number of Waggons pasing to the lake."

On Friday 25th, is this important entry: "This morning Capt. Simpson with 40 Rifle men went on a scout likewise Lt. Bevins with 20 Musqut Men went on a Scout."

This was the squad that guarded the ordnance from Pumpkin Hook up to Springfield where they arrived with "2 pieces of Artillery" on Saturday the 20th.

On June 24, 1779, from "Camp Canajoharie Creek," Clinton had made the following public announcement: "The General returns his most sincere Thanks to the Gentlemen Inhabitants of this State who have so cheerfully and effectually assisted him in the Transportation of the Stores and Boats for the use of the Army toward Otsego Lake."

"Such an exampled patriotic conduct is an happy Omen of our future Success, and an evident Demonstration that we can never be slaves."

Mohawk Valley farmers must have engaged in this movement in large numbers, together with their teams.

It appears from General Orders on June 25, that the light infantry company of Colonel Dubois' regiment was to march that morning on their way to Otsego Lake as soon as they were ready, together with the Train of Artillery Military Stores and Baggage.

TO BE CONTINUED ...
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